IF YOU GO: LA PAZ & UYUNI, BO­LIVIA

Elle (Canada) - - World -

EAT The restau­rant of the mo­ment with ties to Noma founder Claus Meyer is not in Den­mark but La Paz. Meyer opened Gustu, which is “flavour” in Quechua, in 2013 as a so­cial en­ter­prise to el­e­vate the coun­try’s culi­nary scene and train a new gen­er­a­tion of chefs. Chef Kamilla Sei­dler is at the helm now, and she’s tak­ing lo­cal in­gre­di­ents like ama­ranth and pur­ple corn to a new level. EX­PLORE You’ll feel like you are walk­ing through canyons in a lu­nar land­scape at Valle de la Luna, just out­side of La Paz. Go at sun­set, if you can, to see the sur­round­ing moun­tains turn a deep red. If you see any­thing mov­ing in the val­ley, know that you’ve likely spot­ted a fluffy vis­cacha, a chin­chilla that looks more like a rab­bit with a fox tail. It’s the only an­i­mal that lives in the area. RIDE La Paz is the high­est cap­i­tal city in the world. Its moun­tain­ous set­ting makes it im­pos­si­ble to build a sub­way (and public buses are un­re­li­able), so the best way to criss-cross the city is via tram. Go for a ride and take in the view—you’ll get a sense of what it might be like to com­mute to work in a gon­dola. SA­FARI Check in to the Ho­tel de Sal Luna Sal­ada. Con­structed en­tirely of salt blocks, the prop­erty sits on the edge of the 10,500-square-kilo­me­tre Uyuni salt flat. Opt for a multi-day salt sa­fari that will take you to Inc­ahuasi (the cac­tus is­land) and to see flamin­gos, red and green la­goons, vol­ca­noes and even a 1940s-era train grave­yard.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.