CALL TO WOR­SHIP

KEYS N KRATES

Exclaim! - - FREQUENCIES -

Mid­nite Mass Fol­low­ing a steady stream of sin­gles and EPs over the last cou­ple of years, Toronto trio Keys N Krates hit the ground run­ning in 2016 with an­other short-form re­lease on Steve Aoki’s bells-and-whis­tles la­bel Dim Mak. Though the im­print it­self deals mostly with hy­per-com­mer­cial dance re­leases, KNK have al­ways man­aged to keep a big toe un­der­ground, while still draw­ing in the masses. Thank­fully, Mid­nite Mass main­tains that same prac­tice. “U Al­ready Know” boasts a jun­gle rhythm be­neath squeaky vo­cals and big wonky horns, while “Noth­ing But Space” nudges Aqui’s soul­ful vo­cals into the fray be­fore drop­ping its mam­moth bass. Lead­ing the pack, how­ever, is the mas­sive “Save Me,” a track that was con­structed from spare a cap­pel­las that UK singer Katy B con­trib­uted. Mid­nite Mass is an­other ex­am­ple of KNK’s abil­ity to craft songs that sound so vast on your head­phones that they ba­si­cally en­sure your at­ten­dance at their next show, just to hear them fleshed out on stage. The EP also serves a gen­tle re­minder that this kind of arena-EDM doesn’t have to be all sub­stance­less womp. (Dim Mak, dim­mak.com)

DO YOU GUYS SEE YOUR­SELVES AS PINNED TO ANY ONE GENRE?

Turntab­list Greg Daw­son: No, def­i­nitely not. It prob­a­bly works to our dis­ad­van­tage some­times, be­cause I feel like a lot of press is con­stantly try­ing to cat­e­go­rize stuff. Even if they’re for­ward-think­ing, they’re still try­ing to put things in boxes. It’s kinda tough to put us in a box. I mean, we’ll do a record with Katy B and it’ll have a drum & bass in­tro and then the drop is synths and the drums are rap. We’ll take one of our beats and we’ll put a rap­per over it and to us that all makes sense, but it doesn’t nec­es­sar­ily make sense to a mu­sic re­viewer, and we love that, to be hon­est.

THE LINES ARE PRETTY BLURRED TH­ESE DAYS ANY­WAY.

I think the lines have al­ways been blurred. For­get about rap pro­duc­ers, but hip-hop DJs have al­ways cut up rock records, they’ve al­ways cut up Led Zep­pelin records, they’ve al­ways cut up Kraftwerk. Detroit techno is an amal­ga­ma­tion of peo­ple in the ghetto lis­ten­ing to a mix of Kraftwerk and soul mu­sic. The best kind of mu­sic is al­ways try­ing to blur the lines. DARYL KEAT­ING

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