OFF THE SHELF, NOTED ELSE­WHERE

Geist - - Features -

James Tur­rell turns a 400,000-yearold vol­canic cin­der cone into a mas­sive View-master in Two­ism by Ali Blythe (Goose Lane). Joy am­bles up and down the street with a sign that reads: “Are you con­tent to be noth­ing?” in Street Sym­phony by Rachel Wy­att (Coteau Books). At the age of eigh­teen, Michael runs off to live with Je­sus in the woods in Wild Pieces by Cather­ine Ho­gan Safer (Kil­lick Press). It’s up to Ul­rikka S. Gernes to build the pyra­mids, the Suez Canal and the Great Wall of China all by her­self in Frayed Opus for Strings & Wind In­stru­ments, trans­lated by Per Brask and Pa­trick Friesen (Brick Books). A her­mit ob­sessed with taxi­der­mic dio­ra­mas con­nects with a for­est-dwelling feral girl in The Hunter and the Wild Girl by Pauline Hold­stock (Goose Lane Edi­tions). Cather­ine Owen makes a pact with art and as­sumes the man­tel of poet in North Amer­ica in The Other 23 & a Half Hours: Or Ev­ery­thing You Wanted to Know that Your MFA Didn’t Teach You (Wol­sak & Wynn). From the mo­ment they meet, Clyde reck­ons Bon­nie weren’t made to be no nun in Ca­reen by Carolyn Smart (Brick Books). Nicholas Cage, the much loved and much hated ac­tor, is in fact a char­ac­ter cre­ated to nav­i­gate the chal­lenges of nepo­tism in Hol­ly­wood in Na­tional Trea­sure: Nicholas Cage by Lind­say Gibb (ECW Press). The Book of Small Mis­takes is filled with sins the size of a but­ton on a cuff, the toe of a tree frog, black mos­quito lar­vae, the hair on a chin, the screw that holds the hands of a watch to­gether, a spot be­fore it be­comes me­lanoma in The Wrong Cat by Lorna Crozier (Mcclel­land and Ste­wart). Af­ter re­ceiv­ing a pink slip for pub­lic in­de­cency, Joshua Trot­ter asks the Mino­taur over for cof­fee and guid­ance in Mis­sion Creep (Coach House Books). The sec­ond-long­est river in BC gags on cop­per and spits

Iup moun­tains against your wood, steel and con­crete in Skeena by Sarah de Leeuw (Caitlin Press). Af­ter Ju­lia’s death, Kit won­ders if in­fre­quent sex, long walks and a box of let­ters ever added up to a re­la­tion­ship in Find­ing Her Gone by Christo­pher A. Tay­lor (Friesen Press). Michael re­ceives an el­e­gant hand­writ­ten let­ter from the sol­dier who killed his wife in Saw a Man by Owen Sheers (Bond Street Books). In Sleep by Nino Ricci (Doubleday Canada) David Pace dis­cov­ers the cure to his nar­colepsy— a steady stream of phar­ma­ceu­ti­cals and a loaded hand­gun. Laura Clarke de­fends her pur­chase of two mules to be shot, stuffed and ex­hib­ited at the Amer­i­can Mu­seum of Agri­cul­ture in Lub­bock, Texas in De­cline of the An­i­mal King­dom (ECW Press). Ker­mit, the bru­tal dic­ta­tor, iso­lates his pup­pet sub­jects from the rest of the world in Faux­c­ca­sional Po­ems by Daniel Scott Tys­dale (Ice­house Po­etry). Clau­dia Clyde steps out the sev­enth story win­dow of her ho­tel, Sandra Bax­ter holds an elec­tric carv­ing knife against her throat and Shirley Oaten crosses Fifth Av­enue against a red light in He Leaves His Face in the Fu­neral Car by Ar­leen Paré (Caitlin Press). Elec­tro­mag­netic fields through­out Al­ca­traz are mea­sured for para­nor­mal ac­tiv­ity in Float­ing is Ev­ery­thing by Sh­eryda War­rener (Night­wood Edi­tions). Eth­yl­ene de­rives great pride from her H2C=CH2 ge­neal­ogy, but re­veals too much bond cleavage in En­dan­gered Hy­dro­car­bons by Les­ley Bat­tler (Book­thug). Philip Lee fears for the writ­ten word in the ink­less world of in­stanews in The Next Big Thing (Goose Lane Edi­tions). The cash buy­ers of Black­fish Sound jibe their fish tal­lies for the pack­ers to take to the can­nery in Tide Rips & Back Ed­dies by Bill Proc­tor and Yvonne Max­im­chuk (Har­bour Press). In Arms: The Cul­ture and Credo of the Gun by A.J. Som­er­set (Bi­b­lioa­sis) the Cana­dian Shoot­ing Sports As­so­ci­a­tion im­ports the val­ues of the Amer­i­can gun nut into Canada. Jeff Bien waits all night for Noah’s dove, the raven that fed Eli­jah and other fic­tional birds in In a Time of No Song (Ex­ile Edi­tions).

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