SQUAMISH ROCK

Con­sider a world

Gripped - - FEATURE - Story by Lauren Wat­son FOR THE MOST PART, WORK­ING WITH PRO­FES­SION­ALS LIKE JAS­MIN CA­TON, SON­NIE TROT­TER AND JON WALSH IS EASY, HE SAYS, BUT IT ALSO MEANS HE HAS TO KEEP UP.

where you are limited only by your imag­i­na­tion, where you frame your pas­sion and your sense of ad­ven­ture to make a l iv­ing. That is the life of the climb­ing pho­tog­ra­pher. Al­though a dream for many, it is a pro­fes­sion mas­tered by few.

Paul Bride has lived in Squamish for al­most two decades and has nav­i­gated his climb­ing ad­dic­tion through a cam­era lens. He grew up in the f lat­lands of south­ern On­tario and never lacked in­spi­ra­tion or the taste for ad­ven­ture. It was his de­sire that trans­formed the wild places of his imag­i­na­tion into re­alit y. He is glob­ally rec­og­nized and cel­e­brated as a pro­fes­sional climb­ing pho­tog­ra­pher and ath­lete.

These days he trav­els to the far reaches of the earth, most favourably high in the alpine, haul­ing hun­dreds of pounds of cam­era equip­ment in search of new im­ages. His taste for the alpine be­gan in 2004, when he went into the Wadding­ton range of B.C. “A friend of mine had de­scribed Wadding­ton to me be­fore I left as an easy place to die,” Bride said. The shoot re­quired him to ferr y 260 kg of gear over heav­ily crevassed gla­cial

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