Beard Power: Kim Ed­vins­son’s Sö­der­malm

Tracy Ste­fanucci

Hayo - - Contents - WORDS BY BETHANY LENG PHOTOGRAPHY BY JORGE GON­ZA­LEZ

SOME­TIMES A CITY FEELS LIKE FAM­ILY. At least that’s how Yao -Lung Cheng thinks of Taipei. “She’s like an Aunt,” he says, “one that makes you un­com­fort­able as she slurps soup with un­bear­able noise, but sur­prises you with her good taste in mu­sic and film. Over time, you dis­cover things you share in com­mon, adding strength to the knowl­edge that you’ll al­ways be fam­ily.”

Yao-Lung has worked as a barista in Beitou, the hot springs area of Taipei, for three years and loves its slower pace of life. “In other parts of Taipei the traf­fic, rush­ing crowds and street signs can be over­whelm­ing—even for a lo­cal like me,” he says. “Beitou is more like a small town and is close to na­ture. You can see the moun­tains in the dis­tance and the build­ings aren’t that tall, so you still get the sun­shine.”

THOUGHTS ON BEITOU

I like go­ing into shops and hear­ing own­ers chitchat with their cus­tomers. In San­chong —the neigh­bor­hood I live in, in New Taipei City—peo­ple don’t know each other, but if I re­turn to Beitou peo­ple re­mem­ber me and we talk.

COF­FEE SHOPS

The cof­fee scene in Taipei is flour­ish­ing, with new cafes pop­ping up all the time. I work at Sheme House in Beitou, lo­cated in a his­toric build­ing for­merly used to store rice. Peo­ple come from all over the city for the cof­fee and desserts.

GAL­LERIES

Hong-gah Mu­seum in Beitou fo­cuses on video art, with a cor­ri­dor show­ing tra­di­tional paint­ings too.

GET­TING OUT­SIDE

Taipei is a basin—we’re sur­rounded by moun­tains and hills. North of Beitou is Yang­ming Moun­tain, the hot spring’s source, and there are paved paths to hike. I used to go there with my fam­ily to eat “Hot Spring Eggs,” a pic­nic lunch cooked in the hot springs.

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