THE STORY OF YOUR HOME

Kayak (Canada) - - YOUR STORY -

Whether you live in the coun­try or in town, an apart­ment or a bun­ga­low, a new build­ing or an old one, there’s lots you can find out about your home. If you live in a big city, you’ll find doc­u­ments, photographs, draw­ings, maps and other old stuff at the city ar­chives. If you’re in a smaller city or town, the ref­er­ence sec­tion of the li­brary (li­brar­i­ans al­ways like to help!) is a good place to start. You can also try your town hall or mu­nic­i­pal of­fice. And if your home is quite new, you can al­ways find out more about what used to be on the land where your house or apart­ment now stands. Who Was There First? Did your home area be­come part of Canada through a treaty with an Indige­nous group? Is there a First Na­tion that says it never gave up the land? Start your re­search with a quick on­line search of some­thing like “Is [your com­mu­nity] cov­ered by a treaty?”

Things to Look For

As­sess­ment rolls are lists of peo­ple who have paid taxes at your ad­dress. They may only show the men, but of­ten in­clude the job and re­li­gion of the “head of house­hold” and how much money he made. Maps are es­pe­cially help­ful if you live in the coun­try be­cause they usu­ally show how land was di­vided into lots and the name of the owner City di­rec­to­ries also list the “head of the house­hold” at your ad­dress. Find­ing the first year the ad­dress ap­pears will give you a good idea of when your house or apart­ment was built. Fire in­sur­ance plans can tell you the size and shape of a lot, when a build­ing was built or de­mol­ished, and even what ma­te­ri­als were used in con­struct­ing it. Aerial photographs (pho­tos taken look­ing down from a low-fly­ing air­plane) can show build­ings un­der con­struc­tion or be­ing de­mol­ished

In her video for the 2017 Young Cit­i­zens pro­gram, Klaire ex­plored some old houses in Bon­av­ista, NL, and why it is im­por­tant to pro­tect them. Check out her video and the oth­ers at youngc­i­t­i­zens.ca.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.