It’s good to see con­flict in fem­i­nism as it strives to in­clude women across race and class. It means it’s breath­ing, alive, and thriv­ing.

Metro Canada (Vancouver) - - VIEWS -

The by­line leads to a meet­ing with the ed­i­tor of the SlagMag: “We’re ba­si­cally hir­ing you for your landed a new mar­ket­ing job and is ea­ger to net­work at an event hosted by WEMUN, Women En­trepreneurs the courage to say “I don’t know” when deal­ing with some­thing as com­plex as the power of half the planet is hell of a lot bet­ter than the mis­sion state­ment de­manded by some af­ter the Women’s March on Wash­ing­ton.

Re­mem­ber when Glo­ria Steinem and Madeleine Al­bright, two tow­er­ing fig­ures of fem­i­nism, told pro­gres­sive young women who to vote for? Now that a man who has a pub­lic record of de­mean­ing women is pres­i­dent of the U.S., this in­fight­ing over what some might con­sider minu­tiae of fem­i­nism, seems quaint.

The thorny prob­lem here: fem­i­nism, which at its most ba­sic means equal op­por­tu­ni­ties for women in every sphere, doesn’t mean that 3.5 bil­lion peo­ple have to agree with each other. Equal­ity and lib­erty mean very dif­fer­ent things, which is why the French made sure to in­clude both words in their na­tional motto.

It’s good to see con­flicts in the fem­i­nist move­ment as it strives to in­clude women across race and class. It means it’s breath­ing, alive, and thriv­ing.

We are not go­ing to agree on ev­ery­thing, which is why Girls, a show about four mil­len­nial white women liv­ing in Brook­lyn is so good: it rev­els in the mess.

Though Hannah does ex­press a sen­ti­ment that tran­scends all bound­aries: “I def­i­nitely feel more like a dumpling than a woman,” she said.

Wel­come to the club.

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