FIVE THINGS ABOUT TEENS & PHONES

National Post (Latest Edition) - - NEWS -

1 TEENS ASKED ABOUT SO­CIAL ME­DIA

The rea­son for a re­cent Health Canada study was to fig­ure out how best to de­liver healthre­lated mes­sages to teens. Cor­po­rate Re­search As­so­ci­ates Inc. held fo­cus groups with kids be­tween 13 and 17 in Vancouver, Cal­gary, Win­nipeg, Sud­bury, Que­bec City and St. John’s, then de­liv­ered a re­port in March.

2 IN­STA­GRAM, SNAPCHAT ARE TOPS

What they learned isn’t ex­actly sur­pris­ing. Youth “rely on so­cial me­dia as a com­mu­ni­ca­tion tool to con­nect with oth­ers,” and “as a source of en­ter­tain­ment to fill time,” the re­port said. Snapchat, In­sta­gram and YouTube are the pre­ferred chan­nels.

3 USED TO HELP WITH SO­CIAL ANX­I­ETY

Some­times they rely on their phones to avoid talk­ing face to face. “At fam­ily events when you re­ally don’t want to talk to some­one, it’s eas­i­est just to take out your phone and avoid the awk­ward con­ver­sa­tion,” one teen said.

4 NOT THE PLACE FOR HEALTH QUES­TIONS

Teenagers aren’t about to ask health ques­tions to their peers on so­cial me­dia, the study con­cludes. “I’d look dumb if I posted a se­ri­ous ques­tion on so­cial me­dia. Why would I do that?” one par­tic­i­pant said. They are much more likely to just Google it.

5 SHOWS AN OP­POR­TU­NITY

“Find­ings show there is clearly an op­por­tu­nity for gov­ern­ment to align health-related in­for­ma­tion for youth on key so­cial me­dia plat­forms,” the re­port says. An on­line por­tal de­signed specif­i­cally for their age group could be help­ful, the “Dis­cover” feed on Snapchat could work and Facebook would be ef­fec­tive be­cause par­ents would see it.

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