sours

NOW Magazine - Beer Guide - - TORONTO BEER GUIDE -

These sum­mer-per­fect beer styles get their puck­er­ing lip-smack from lac­to­bacil­lus and other funky mi­cro-crit­ters dur­ing spon­ta­neous fer­men­ta­tion.

When it comes to Bel­gian lam­bics, fruits like cher­ries (used to make krieks), cur­rants and rasp­ber­ries are tra­di­tional ad­juncts. Some lam­bics are more sweet than sour due to the ad­di­tion of sugar and fruit flavour­ings post-fer­men­ta­tion. Drier styles re­sult when the ma­jor­ity of sug­ars (fruit or oth­er­wise) are con­sumed by hun­gry yeasts to fuel the fer­men­ta­tion process.

In­creas­ingly pop­u­lar Ber­liner Weiss was com­monly served with a shot of rasp­berry or woodruff syrup to curb its sharp­ness – a kind of choose-your-own-sour-fruit-beer ad­ven­ture.

There’s a fruit sour out there for ev­ery­one. You might just have to put in a hard day’s drink­ing to find it. Lin­de­mens Pecher­esse, Framboise, Cas­sis and Ap­ple (at Prenup Pub) Can­til­lon Rosé de Gam­bri­nus with cher­ries and Vigneronne with muscat grapes (at Bar Volo) Mort Su­bite Framboise Lam­bic (LCBO 602888, 375 ml/$4.10) Dieu du Ciel! Sol­stice d’Été Ber­liner Weiss with rasp­ber­ries (at Bar Volo) Bell­woods Barn Owl sour bar­rel-aged brett ale with ginger, apri­cot and cran­ber­ries (on tap at Bell­woods)

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.