Stop wast­ing food – there’s an app for that

UP TO HALF THE FOOD WE PRO­DUCE IS TRASHED ON FIELDS, IN STORE DUMP­STERS AND HOUSE­HOLD BINS. AS A CAM­PAIGN CALL­ING FOR CANADA TO BAN GRO­CER WASTE ROLLS OUT, HERE ARE SOME NEW TRICKS AND TIPS TO HELP US GET A GRIP.

NOW Magazine - - CONTENTS -

FOODFUL.LY

How many times have you for­got­ten let­tuce or hum­mus at the back of your fridge? Well, there’s an app for that, com­ing out in mid-Au­gust. Foodful.ly syncs your gro­cery pur­chases to keep tabs on what’s in your re­frig­er­a­tor. Just snap and scan a pic of your gro­cery bill and it tracks your food’s life­span and sends re­minders to eat it all be­fore it goes off. It also of­fers recipe sug­ges­tions to match up with your list so you don’t have to scratch your head won­der­ing what the hell to do with that mas­sive egg­plant. FLASHFOOD Free­gans know you can find an as­ton­ish­ing amount of good food in gro­cery dump­sters. Lit­er­ally tonnes of edi­bles make their way into garbage ev­ery year. If you’re not game for dump­ster skim­ming (my big brother got par­a­sites free­gan­ing back in univer­sity), you can score food from gro­cers and restau­rants be­fore they trash it with a new app called Flashfood, which no­ti­fies you of flash sales. Food will be of­fered at a min­i­mum 50 per cent off, and noth­ing will be sold after its best-be­fore date. Flashfood takes 25 per cent of the cost, and you’ll get a good deal while res­cu­ing food from land­fill, which should make it ex­tratasty. The app is set for re­lease at the end of Au­gust.

#WHATAWASTE

Food waste haters were green with envy when France and then Italy passed laws to stop su­per­mar­kets from throw­ing out or de­lib­er­ately de­stroy­ing food that’s still ed­i­ble. Now gro­cers in both coun­tries must do­nate that un­sold food to lo­cal char­i­ties and food banks. Nearly 65,000 Cana­di­ans have signed a Change.org pe­ti­tion urg­ing our gov­ern­ment to do the same and force su­per­mar­kets to give goods that are no longer “fit for sale,” wrong­fully pack­aged or dam­aged to char­i­ties or to farms for an­i­mal feed or com­post. The peeps be­hind the #WhatAWaste cam­paign are gun­ning for 100,000 sig­na­tures as they de­velop pol­icy pro­pos­als. Sign the pe­ti­tion at waw­cam­paign.ca. Now all Toronto needs is a gro­cer that merges Van­cou­ver’s pack­ag­ing-free Zero Waste Mar­ket with Copen­hagen’s WeFood, which sells pro­duce past due dates at 30 to 50 per cent off. CHILLED SOUPS, STOCKS AND STOCKTAILS Time to dig out all those wilt­ing greens hid­ing in the re­cesses of your fridge and get cook­ing, stir­ring and whirring them into some amaz­ing chilled sum­mer soups, stocks and stocktails. Think cur­ried sum­mer squash, gar­den greens vichys­soise or Eleven Madi­son’s straw­berry gaz­pa­cho with gar­lic thyme crou­tons (from stale bread, nat­u­rally). Stock is even bet­ter for end-of-week fridge cleanups, since you can throw in pretty much ev­ery sad, for­lorn veg­gie bit you’ve got, in­clud­ing onion skins, shriv­elled-up gar­lic cloves and pars­ley stems. You can freeze it in handy sil­i­cone muf­fin tins for later use in recipes, or get cre­ative and try drink­ing it chilled as an elec­trolyte-rich hy­dra­tor or in a fancy stock­tail. Yes, broth cock­tails are a thing.

IG­NORE FOODKEEPER AND BEST-BE­FORE DATES

Still let­ting best-be­fore dates dic­tate your food life? For the most part, time stamps on food are just a ploy to get cus­tomers toss­ing and buy­ing more sooner than they need to. I reg­u­larly eat yo­gurt two weeks past its ex­piry date. Just cracked an ex­pired car­ton of or­ganic milk, and it was good an­other 10 days, easy. There are some safety is­sues, of course. USDA’s FoodKeeper app says raw eggs can only be eaten up to four days after crack­ing. But in many cases it’ll lead you to waste need­lessly, as in ad­vis­ing you to toss your olive-bar olives after two weeks in the fridge. (Wha?) Or that but­ter shouldn’t be left at room temp for more than a day or two. (Oh, come on.) eco­holic@now­toronto.com | @eco­holic­na­tion

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.