It’s a start-up-ven­ture pace that would seem lethar­gic or al­most dor­mant in the city, but in the coun­try, it seems just about right.

Ottawa Magazine - - Art + Furtniture -

Pho­tog­ra­pher : URSZULA MUNTEAN

Sub­jects : LUC ALARY AND STEPHANIE JACK

Just as it takes time to en­joy a great cup of cof­fee, Luc Alary and Stephanie Jack have a sim­i­lar slow pace to their cof­fee busi­ness.

The idea came to Luc in when uni­ver­sity. In­spired by a friend who was roast­ing and sell­ing cof­fee in Bri­tish Columbia, he wrote the busi­ness plan for Blue­barn Cof­fee way back in 2006. A cou­ple of years later, af­ter grad­u­at­ing, he pur­chased a 30-acre ru­ral prop­erty near Wake­field — an area he ca­noed and cot­taged in as a youth.

It took an­other two years be­fore Luc built — or rather, re­built — on the prop­erty. Per­haps your def­i­ni­tion of a slow build, he dis­as­sem­bled a 150-year-old farm­house in Ren­frew County and moved it to Wake­field.

Luc met Stephanie in 2012, and a year later the cou­ple got around to build­ing the blue barn, where they would roast their cof­fee. Once again, it was a re­build. Took two years.

The fi­nal step was or­der­ing a state-of-the-art Pro­bat roaster from Ger­many. “These ma­chines have been around for more than a cen­tury and last a life­time,” says Luc. In 2016, the cou­ple got down to the busi­ness of roast­ing. It’s a start-up-ven­ture pace that would seem lethar­gic or al­most dor­mant in the city, but in the coun­try, it seems just about right.

“It’s been a process, but it’s one we’ve re­ally en­joyed,” says Stephanie.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.