Weekly crop re­port

Prince Albert Daily Herald - - CLASSIFIEDS - GOV­ERN­MENT OF SASKATCHEWAN

Wet and cool weather de­layed har­vest for most pro­duc­ers this past week, ac­cord­ing to Saskatchewan Agri­cul­ture’s weekly Crop Re­port. Seven­tyeight per cent of the crop is now in the bin, slightly up from 75 per cent last week. Har­vest progress re­mains ahead of the five-year (2012-2016) av­er­age of 74 per cent for this time of year. Fif­teen per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Many pro­duc­ers ex­pect to be back in the field when warmer weather re­turns and crops can dry suf­fi­ciently.

Har­vest is most ad­vanced in the south­west­ern re­gion, where 92 per cent of the crop is now com­bined. The south­east­ern re­gion has 88 per cent com­bined, the west-cen­tral re­gion 81 per cent and the east-cen­tral re­gion 77 per cent. The north­east­ern re­gion has 53 per cent com­bined, while the north­west­ern re­gion has 48 per cent com­bined.

Ninety-four per cent of the mus­tard, 91 per cent of the du­rum, 88 per cent of the chick­peas, 84 per cent of the bar­ley, 77 per cent of the spring wheat, 68 per cent of the canola and oats, 66 per cent of the ca­nary­seed, 37 per cent of the flax and 18 per cent of the soy­beans have now been com­bined. Twenty-seven per cent of the canola is swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Although the rain was wel­comed by many pro­duc­ers in the drier ar­eas of the prov­ince, those in the cen­tral and north­ern ar­eas need warm and dry weather soon so that har­vest can re­sume. Rain­fall this past week ranged from nil to 36 mm in the Deb­den and Haf­ford ar­eas.

Top­soil mois­ture con­di­tions con­tinue to im­prove with the re­cent rain­fall, although the sub­soil will need sig­nif­i­cant new mois­ture to re­plen­ish what has been lost to the hot and dry weather. Across the prov­ince, top­soil mois­ture on crop­land is rated as 29 per cent ad­e­quate, 36 per cent short and 35 per cent very short. Hay land and pas­ture top­soil mois­ture is rated as 22 per cent ad­e­quate, 34 per cent short and 44 per cent very short.

The ex­tended pe­riod of hot and dry con­di­tions this sum­mer has neg­a­tively af­fected pro­duc­tion, par­tic­u­larly in the south­ern and cen­tral re­gions. Canola crops suf­fered the most, as much of the crop was in full flow­er­ing dur­ing the hottest time of the sea­son; there are in­di­ca­tions that yield has been re­duced by as much as 75 per cent in some ar­eas. Soy­bean crops have been slow to ma­ture and there are re­ports of pods not fill­ing com­pletely. Many lentil and ce­real crops were un­able to fill prop­erly as they ran out of mois­ture much ear­lier than nor­mal; lighter bushel weights and smaller seeds have re­sulted. There are also re­ports of re­duced pro­tein con­tent in ce­real crops. While yields have been di­rectly af­fected by the ex­tremely dry con­di­tions, crop qual­ity has been good to ex­cel­lent with min­i­mal dis­ease is­sues.

The ma­jor­ity of crop dam­age this past week was due to wildlife, strong winds, frost and lack of mois­ture. Pas­tures and hay land have suf­fered greatly from the lack of mois­ture and will need sig­nif­i­cant rain­fall.

Pro­duc­ers are busy com­bin­ing, com­plet­ing fall field work, mov­ing cat­tle and haul­ing bales.

Har­vest ground to a halt this past week, thanks to the re­cent rain­fall. Very lit­tle com­bin­ing was done and har­vest progress re­mains at 53 per cent. The five-year (2012-2016) av­er­age for this time of year is 69 per cent. Thirty-four per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Sev­eral weeks of warm and dry weather will be needed for the rest of the crop to dry down suf­fi­ciently for com­bin­ing. Some crop is com­ing off tough and be­ing placed in aer­a­tion bins.

Rain­fall this past week ranged from 7 mm in the Melfort area to 35 mm in the Ni­pawin area. The Ni­pawin area has re­ported the most pre­cip­i­ta­tion (554 mm) in the re­gion since April 1. Top­soil mois­ture con­di­tions have greatly im­proved with the re­cent mois­ture. Across the re­gion, top­soil mois­ture con­di­tions on crop­land are rated as 50 per cent ad­e­quate, 45 per cent short and five per cent very short. Hay land and pas­ture top­soil mois­ture is rated as 36 per cent ad­e­quate, 56 per cent short and eight per cent very short.

A hard frost hit last week, although dam­age is ex­pected to be min­i­mal as most crops were ad­vanced enough. Strong winds have also blown some swaths around. Birds and deer have been dam­ag­ing swathed crops.

Very lit­tle har­vest progress was made last week due to scat­tered show­ers and cooler weather. Forty-eight per cent of the crop is now in the bin, up slightly from 46 per cent last week but well be­hind the five-year (2012-2016) av­er­age of 71 per cent for this time of year. Sev­eral weeks of warm and dry weather will be needed for re­main­ing crops to dry down suf­fi­ciently for com­bin­ing. Some crops are be­ing taken off tough and placed in aer­a­tion bins.

Most of the re­gion re­ceived rain­fall last week, rang­ing from small amounts to 36 mm in the Deb­den and Haf­ford ar­eas. The Pierce­land area has re­ported the most pre­cip­i­ta­tion (563 mm) in both the re­gion and the prov­ince since April 1.

Top­soil mois­ture con­di­tions con­tinue to im­prove, thanks to the rain. Crop­land top­soil mois­ture con­di­tions are rated as 63 per cent ad­e­quate, 34 per cent short and three per cent very short. Hay land and pas­ture top­soil mois­ture is rated as 56 per cent ad­e­quate, 41 per cent short and three per cent very short.

Strong winds and frost are the ma­jor causes of crop dam­age this past week. While frost was re­ported over sev­eral nights, dam­age has been min­i­mal as most crops were ad­vanced enough. There have been a few re­ports of sprout­ing in some ce­real crops and high green counts in canola.

Wildlife such as geese and deer have also dam­aged some swathed crops. Post-har­vest her­bi­cide ap­pli­ca­tions con­tinue in those ar­eas with ac­tive weed growth.

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