In­ter­view

Bob, folk­lore says you never took a writ­ing class but wrote every day for twenty years, alone, read­ing books on craft, be­fore sell­ing your first story at forty-two. Would you rec­om­mend the path of ‘closet writer’ to oth­ers?

Pulp Literature - - IF YOU’D LIKE TO MAKE A CALL, PLEASE HANG UP -

Bob Thurber

Pulp Lit­er­a­ture: Bob Thurber: I wouldn’t dare make rec­om­men­da­tions con­cern­ing any­one’s path. In my case, I re­ally didn’t know what I was do­ing for a good many years. My orig­i­nal plan had been go to col­lege and study for a de­gree in jour­nal­ism, but life got in the way of that. Per­sonal cir­cum­stances re­quired I take an al­ter­nate route to learn­ing how to write. So I had a plan B, then a plan C. I went through the en­tire al­pha­bet. My life kept chang­ing so I had to keep ad­just­ing. Early on, all I wanted to write was non-fic­tion, opin­ion pieces, Sun­day mag­a­zine kind of stuff. Light com­men­tary with a hu­mor­ous flair. And maybe some bad poetry, or ram­bling prose po­ems when the feel­ing struck. Then I got hooked on the short story. I couldn’t stop read­ing them. I gob­bled up every­thing from Mau­pas­sant to Barthelme, and I be­came ob­sessed with learn­ing how they pulled off the tricks they pulled, the crafts­man­ship, the ac­cu­racy, the sub­tle vague­ness,

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.