Trig­ger logic

TANIS FRANCO

Room Magazine - - POETRY -

i. a trig­ger, some­one, some­one else, and a room. should there be some­one else when there is a trig­ger in the room. some­one was there al­ready, some­one else is new, the room used to be, and the trig­ger came af­ter the room. the room was al­ways pre­vi­ously empty. ex­cept for some­one. it used to be some­one, a room, and empty. then came the blunt ei­ther/ or pos­si­bil­ity of a trig­ger. is it off or on? is some­one here or there? now that some­one else is there, the ques­tion is should no one be in the room or should some­one be in the room when there is some­thing present that can go off.

ii. af­ter it is pulled it has to de­cide, some­one or some­one else, one is go­ing to leave the room: some­one leaves the room and they sur­vive, for the mo­ment be­ing, they out­live the trig­ger outside of the room, alone, as it was done. if some­one else leaves the room first then the room is how it was, some­one is alone, as it was done. if the room is how it was and it is empty, just a some­one, it is kind of nice, it is com­fort­ing, be­cause that is how it used be done and it is easy and it is sleepy.

iii. there can be some­one else if some­one else knows what to do but if some­one else says i do not know what to do it is bet­ter that the room is empty; it is how it used to be. i don’t know what to do is the same as the room be­ing empty, some­one else may as well not even be in the room. noth­ing but a trig­ger be­tween a some­one and a some­one else in a room.

iv. if both some­one and some­one else and the trig­ger in the on po­si­tion de­cide to stay in the room, or sim­ply can’t move, ei­ther some­one else pulls some­one out, pulls and pulls, as if pulling a house through the op­po­site spin­ning di­rec­tion of a tor­nado, which is un­nat­u­ral, and against bi­ol­ogy, or if some­one and some­one else de­cide to stay in the room, or sim­ply can’t move, and the trig­ger is then ig­nited in some­one, and the trig­ger is now ig­nited in some­one else, then it takes a great amount of force, a great amount of force, the great­est amount of force for some­one or some­one else to pull them­selves out, and then again must en­ter again and pull some­one or some­one else out as if pulling a house through the op­po­site spin­ning di­rec­tion of a tor­nado, which is un­nat­u­ral, and against the laws of physics.

v. these are the log­i­cal pos­si­bil­i­ties.

Emily’s Dream I by Eva Redamonti 2016; In­dia ink on pa­per

35.56 x 43.18 cm

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