SE­NIOR SPOT­LIGHT

Simcoe Reformer - Times-Reformer - - SENIOR SPOTLIGHT -

FOUR GREAT REA­SONS TO STAY AC­TIVE IN RE­TIRE­MENT

Are you a re­cent re­tiree? While it’s com­pletely nat­u­ral to want to slow down a bit and get some well-de­served rest, keep in mind that it’s also im­por­tant that you re­main phys­i­cally ac­tive. Here are four ex­cel­lent rea­sons to keep ex­er­cis­ing after you re­tire: 1. To pre­vent cer­tain ill­nesses. Reg­u­larly tak­ing part in phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity is, un­sur­pris­ingly, ex­cel­lent for your health. It helps stave off ill­nesses such as os­teo­poro­sis, di­a­betes, heart dis­ease and high blood pres­sure, to name just a few. 2.To stay happy. Ex­er­cise causes your body to re­lease hor­mones (namely, en­dor­phins and sero­tonin) that di­rectly in­flu­ence your mood. Stud­ies also show a pos­i­tive cor­re­la­tion be­tween phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity and re­duced symp­toms of de­pres­sion. 3. To im­prove your so­cial life. Re­tire­ment can leave your so­cial life feel­ing a bit empty. Try­ing dif­fer­ent group ac­tiv­i­ties (swim­ming les­sons, yoga classes, walk­ing clubs) is a great way to meet new peo­ple and make new friends. 4. To achieve the best pos­si­ble qual­ity of life. Reg­u­lar phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity will help you sleep bet­ter, im­prove your bal­ance and pos­ture, re­duce joint pain and stiff­ness, and con­trib­ute to main­tain­ing your mo­bil­ity and in­de­pen­dence.

PC : Reg­u­lar ex­er­cise is good for your health, your mood and your so­cial life. Get mov­ing!

TIPS FOR CHOOS­ING THE RIGHT READ­ING GLASSES

Read­ing glasses, widely avail­able at op­tom­e­try clin­ics as well as in most drug­stores, are great for cor­rect­ing pres­by­opia (com­monly known as far-sight­ed­ness). If you need a new pair of glasses to help you see up close, here are a few things to con­sider. First things first: you’ll need to de­ter­mine the lens strength re­quired to cor­rect your far-sight­ed­ness. Be­cause vi­sion prob­lems can vary due to an as­sort­ment of fac­tors, don’t sim­ply buy the first pair you get your hands on. Visit an eye doc­tor to find out ex­actly how strong your lenses need to be in or­der to im­prove your vi­sion. Pre­scrip­tions typ­i­cally vary be­tween +0.50 and +3.50.

Next, start shop­ping for a pair of read­ing glasses to suit your style and needs. What­ever your tastes and bud­get, you’re sure to find an ex­ten­sive se­lec­tion of op­tions to choose from.

Style con­cerns aside, con­sider how you’ll be us­ing your new glasses. If you plan on wear­ing them for ex­tended pe­ri­ods, choose a pair with a light­weight frame. If, on the other hand, you’ll only be us­ing them ev­ery once in a while for a cou­ple of min­utes, go with a pair that folds in the mid­dle for easy stor­age, or that you can sim­ply wear around your neck.

On that note, happy shop­ping!

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