Sym­bol of the bat­tle­field

Simcoe Reformer - - CLASSIFIEDS -

The poppy is more than a mem­ory of the bat­tle­field, it is the univer­sal sym­bol of all the lost lives and self­less acts of our troops in all wars, past and present. Each Novem­ber, mil­lions of Cana­di­ans wear the Le­gion’s red poppy. The small red flower has never been for­got­ten, nor has the mem­ory of the more than 117,000 sol­diers who died in com­bat. mul­ti­tudes of wild pop­pies grew among the sim­ple wooden crosses that marked the im­pro­vised graves. He would never have imag­ined that the red poppy would soon be­come the sym­bol of our fallen sol­diers. The poppy has been the of­fi­cial flower of Re­mem­brance Day since 1921. Im­mor­tal­ized by the poem “In Flan­ders Fields”, by John Mccrae, the poppy en­sures that the men and women who gave their lives shall never be for­got­ten. When he wrote his poem, Lieu­tenant Colonel Mccrae had just lost a fel­low sol­dier, who died in com­bat. An ex­pres­sion of his an­guish and a re­flec­tion of his sur­round­ings, John Mccrae wrote these 15 lines in 20 min­utes. He was in a field where

When he wrote his poem, Lieu­tenant Colonel John Mccrae would never have imag­ined that the red poppy would quickly be­come the univer­sal sym­bol of our fallen sol­diers.

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