“MORE MUST BE DONE TO AD­DRESS THIS LONG-STAND­ING PROB­LEM BE­FORE THE PUB­LIC COM­PLETELY LOSES CON­FI­DENCE IN THE JUS­TICE SYS­TEM.”

Daniel Brown, vice-pres­i­dent of the Crim­i­nal Lawyers’ As­so­ci­a­tion

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that it can con­tinue with the im­por­tant busi­ness of de­liv­er­ing timely ac­cess to jus­tice.”

In her op-ed, pub­lished Sept. 17, Wil­son-ray­bould said she must con­duct “due dili­gence to en­sure I name only the most mer­i­to­ri­ous can­di­dates to the bench” and also en­sure that the bench re­flects the di­ver­sity of the coun­try.

“Some, in­clud­ing se­nior mem­bers of the ju­di­ciary, have ar­gued that the long-stand­ing prob­lem of court de­lays would be solved if I filled all va­can­cies at the same time. They say too much due dili­gence is get­ting in the way of faster ap­point­ments. That as­ser­tion de­mands a re­sponse,” Wil­son­ray­bould wrote.

The min­is­ter spoke about the topic of di­ver­sity in the courts at an event for mem­bers of the le­gal com­mu­nity at the Univer­sity of Toronto law school al­most two weeks ago. The event was closed to the me­dia and the Star was told the min­is­ter was not avail­able for an in­ter­view.

Her spokesman David Tay­lor told the Star Mon­day that Wil­son-ray­bould has ap­pointed 58 judges to On­tario since be­com­ing min­is­ter in 2015 and 14 since Au­gust.

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