Fox run close to many

An­nual Terry Fox Run this Sun­day along the Bar­rie lakeshore; lo­cal event has raised $2M

The Barrie Examiner - - FRONT PAGE - CHERYL BROWNE BAR­RIE EX­AM­INER

Mike McDougall wears his red Terry Fox shirt proudly.

The newly crowned pres­i­dent of the Bar­rie Terry Fox Run, held in mem­ory of the young Cana­dian’s death to cancer in 1981, will be stand­ing with dozens of peo­ple dressed in red when the walk be­gins Sun­day morn­ing.

“Every­body in a red shirt goes to the front of the line; they’re ei­ther cancer sur­vivors or going through cancer treat­ment,” McDougall said on Wed­nes­day.

Di­ag­nosed with lym­phoma two years ago, he said he is feel­ing well enough to or­ga­nize the Terry Fox Run this year, in mem­ory of his mother and sis­ter, who both died of cancer.

“My en­tire fam­ily died of cancer. I did not ex­pect to still be here,” he said.

McDougall be­gan vol­un­teer­ing as the run’s food and bev­er­age helper a few years ago and now ex­pects to run Bar­rie’s walk along the lakeshore on Sun­day.

Al­though the City of Bar­rie has com­pleted most of the work near Cen­ten­nial Beach, a por­tion of the wa­ter­front is still un­der con­struc­tion, said city en­gi­neer Leonard Borgdorff.

The win­ter ice rink, a bas­ket­ball court, grassy area and Tif­fin Boat Launch park­ing will be com­pleted by the end of Novem­ber, he said.

“But there is def­i­nitely pedes­trian ac­cess around the area for the Terry Fox Run,” Borgdorff said.

In its 37th year, Bar­rie’s Terry Fox Run hon­ours the Bri­tish Columbia na­tive who ran 42 kilo­me­tres a day – for 143 days – on a pros­thetic limb to raise money for cancer re­search.

In 1980, Fox be­gan his Marathon of Hope in St. John’s, N.L., and only stopped af­ter run­ning 5,373 kms (or 3,339 miles) near Thun­der Bay due to short­ness of breath.

The cancer that had taken his leg had spread to his lungs.

Fox died the fol­low­ing sum­mer on June 28, 1981. He was 22.

As Bar­rie’s for­mer run pres­i­dent, Pa­trick Scott says there are no prizes for fin­ish­ing the run first.

“It’s not a race, you’re not be­ing timed. We’ve done ev­ery­thing we can to make sure every­body who wants to can par­tic­i­pate,” Scott said.

Al­though the five-km or 10-km run be­gins at 9 a.m., it doesn’t end un­til the last walker crosses the fin­ish line, which is usu­ally Deb­bie Roblin, who walks with an as­sis­tive-leg de­vice.

Bar­rie’s race usu­ally raises ap­prox­i­mately $100,000 each year, to­talling $2 mil­lion dur­ing the last al­most 40 years.

Will Dwyer, 92, is re­spon­si­ble for al­most $800,000 of that.

Dwyer has reached into many Bar­rie res­i­dents’ wal­lets dur­ing the past 37 years and says he hopes to col­lect $1 mil­lion for the run be­fore he dies.

“I’m just try­ing to help peo­ple with cancer and try­ing to pre­vent peo­ple from get­ting cancer,” he said.

As of Wed­nes­day, Dwyer said he has col­lected $36,000 for this year’s walk, and will con­tinue up un­til the walk fin­ishes Sun­day af­ter­noon.

For more in­for­ma­tion, visit http://bit.ly/2wXGT27. CBrowne@post­media.com Twit­ter.com/cheryl­browne1

MARK WANZEL/PHOTO

Mike McDougall holds a pic­ture of his mother and sis­ter, who both lost their bat­tles with cancer. McDougall, who is also a cancer sur­vivor, is now pres­i­dent of the Bar­rie Terry Fox Run com­mit­tee. It takes place Sun­day.

MARK WANZEL/PHOTO

Mike McDougall holds a pic­ture of his mother and sis­ter, who both lost their bat­tles with cancer. McDougall, who is also a cancer sur­vivor, is now pres­i­dent of the Bar­rie Terry Fox Run com­mit­tee.

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