TO­DAY IN HIS­TORY

The Beacon Herald - - NEWS -

In 100 B.C., Julius Cae­sar, the most fa­mous gen­eral in Ro­man his­tory, was born.

In 1762, Czar Peter III of Rus­sia was de­throned in a coup.

In 1789, the British ship “Princess Royal” was seized by Spa­niards at Nootka, B.C.

In 1793, the French rev­o­lu­tion­ary Jean-Paul

Marat was as­sas­si­nated in his bath­tub by Char­lotte Cor­day, who was ex­e­cuted four days later.

In 1837, Queen Vic­to­ria be­came the first monarch to move into Buck­ing­ham Palace.

In 1863, the Scot­tish Re­form Act re­quired Scots­men to wear some­thing un­der their kilts.

In 1865, a large wooden con­duit into the Ot­tawa

River, de­signed to sup­ply govern­ment build­ings on Par­lia­ment Hill with wa­ter, was com­pleted.

In 1886, Fa­ther Ed­ward Flana­gan, Amer­i­can Ro­man Catholic par­ish priest and founder of Boys Town, was born. He be­lieved there was “no such thing as a bad boy.” In 1922, he or­ga­nized Boys Town near Omaha, Neb.

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