Work to­gether to end elder abuse

The Compass - - SOCIALS -

Abuse and acts of vi­o­lence against se­niors are se­ri­ous hu­man rights in­fringe­ments, which af­flict all so­ci­eties through­out the world.

The abuse of se­niors can come in many dif­fer­ent forms. Whether we’re talk­ing about phys­i­cal vi­o­lence, psy­cho­log­i­cal or emo­tional vi­o­lence, sex­ual abuse, ne­glect or fi­nan­cial abuse, all are rep­re­hen­si­ble acts which must be pun­ished. And let’s not de­ceive our­selves: vi­o­lence against se­niors is present in all lev­els of so­ci­ety, rich or poor, ru­ral or ur­ban. Abuse can oc­cur in any re­la­tion­ship where there is a bond of trust or of au­thor­ity be­tween the ag­gres­sor and the vic­tim. The ag­gres­sor is usu­ally a mem­ber of the fam­ily, a spouse, a child, a brother or a sis­ter, but could also be a neigh­bour or an em­ployee of the es­tab­lish­ment where the vic­tim lives.

How can you tell if a se­nior you know is a vic­tim of abuse? By looking for cer­tain signs. El­ders who are vic­tims of vi­o­lence or ne­glect tend to show signs of de­pres­sion or of anx­i­ety and can be­come more pas­sive, docile and so­cially iso­lated. If you sus­pect that a se­nior is a vic­tim of abuse, talk to him or her, don’t judge them and be­lieve what they tell you. Af­ter­wards, find out what re­sources are avail­able to help this per­son and en­cour­age them to ask for help.

Elder abuse and vi­o­lence are se­ri­ous hu­man rights in­fringe­ments. El­ders who are vic­tims of vi­o­lence or ne­glect tend to show signs of de­pres­sion or of anx­i­ety and can be­come more pas­sive, docile and so­cially iso­lated.

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