Re­mem­brance Day of­fers hope for peace­ful fu­ture

Cer­e­monies held through­out the re­gion to hon­our those who braved bat­tles

The Compass - - FRONT PAGE - BY AN­DREW ROBIN­SON AND NI­CHOLAS MERCER

With a cool breeze blow­ing flags just be­hind the Ceno­taph in Car­bon­ear, hun­dreds stood to re­flect on the sac­ri­fices of oth­ers — many of whom left this Earth a long time ago.

The lo­cal Re­mem­brance Day cer­e­mony com­pelled folks of all ages to gather on Wa­ter Street in front of the Ceno­taph and watch as wreaths were laid, songs were played, and words of wis­dom were shared.

Pas­tor Jesse Bown of Open Door Min­istries in Car­bon­ear spoke about the history of ceno­taphs and how an­cient Greeks erected them to rep­re­sent one per­son or many buried else­where.

“Even then, peo­ple did not want to for­get what oth­ers had done,” Bown said Fri­day morn­ing.

He went on to talk about other mon­u­ments, not­ing their pur­pose gen­er­ally re­mains the same, re­gard­less of form.

“Whether it is a head­stone, a standing stone or a ceno­taph, the mes­sage is all the same. Re­mem­ber. Re­mem­ber. Re­mem­ber. Even though we gather here pub­li­cally twice a year (for Me­mo­rial Day July 1 and Re­mem­brance Day), this Ceno­taph re­mains. Cry­ing out day and night through all the sea­sons the same mes­sage. Re­mem­ber. Re­mem­ber. Re­mem­ber.

“And as we leave this place, we too are called to be standing stones in our cul­ture. To be liv­ing tes­ti­monies of what it means to seek jus­tice, to re­sist evil, and to live in peace with oth­ers as far as it de­pends on us. For in so do­ing, we hon­our them who made the supreme sac­ri­fice. We will re­mem­ber them.”

And as we leave this place, we too are called to be standing stones in our cul­ture. To be liv­ing tes­ti­monies of what it means to seek jus­tice, to re­sist evil, and to live in peace with oth­ers as far as it de­pends on us. Jesse Bown

Rep­re­sen­ta­tives of Royal Cana­dian Le­gion Branch 23 Car­bon­ear, lo­cal cadet groups, mu­nic­i­pal lead­ers, the Car­bon­ear Vol­un­teer Fire Depart­ment and other com­mu­nity or­ga­ni­za­tions were present for Fri­day’s cer­e­mony. Those groups laid dozens of wreath in front of the Ceno­taph, as did a num­ber of in­di­vid­u­als hon­our­ing the mem­ory of rel­a­tives who con­trib­uted to war ef­forts.

In Bay Roberts, peo­ple came early and of­ten. Just af­ter 10 a.m., over a dozen peo­ple had turned out, and as the 11 a.m. start time drew nearer, the crowd kept get­ting big­ger and big­ger.

By the time the pa­rade from the Royal Cana­dian Le­gion reached the site, hun­dreds had made their way to the Ceno­taph. Ob­servers re­marked it was the largest turnout they’ve seen on Nov. 11 for quite some time.

Peo­ple clogged up Wa­ter Street in front of the me­mo­rial and var­i­ous youth groups lined the walk­way.

“It rep­re­sents a re­newal in re­mem­brance,” said Bay Roberts Mayor and Royal Cana­dian Le­gion Branch 32 mem­ber Philip Wood.

The wind stayed down as dozens of groups and fam­i­lies took turns to lay a wreath in mem­ory of a loved one.

“It’s good to know that those who sac­ri­ficed and those who con­tinue to sac­ri­fice are be­ing re­mem­bered,” said Wood.

AN­DREW ROBIN­SON/TC ME­DIA

Harold Evely, far right, joins other mem­bers of Royal Cana­dian Le­gion Branch 23 Car­bon­ear in the singing of ‘O Canada.’

AN­DREW ROBIN­SON/TC ME­DIA

Young Owen Os­mond of Car­bon­ear pins his poppy to a white cross along­side his grand­par­ents, Jean­nie and Rudy Gar­land of Vic­to­ria.

AN­DREW ROBIN­SON/TC ME­DIA

Young Owen Os­mond of Car­bon­ear pins his poppy to a white cross along­side his grand­par­ents, Jean­nie and Rudy Gar­land of Vic­to­ria.

NI­CHOLAS MERCER/TC ME­DIA

Dozens of wreaths were laid at the Ceno­taph on Fri­day. Here are Steve Ta­lyor and his wife Ros­alee.

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