Berry buy­ers be­ware

The Compass - - Editorial -

As ev­ery­one knows here in New­found­land and Labrador, late sum­mer and early fall is prime time for berry pick­ers to make a few ex­tra dol­lars through road­side sales of bakeap­ples, blue­ber­ries and par­tridge­ber­ries; the last to har­vest be­ing the par­tridge­ber­ries.

Bakeap­ples are prob­a­ble the most ex­pen­sive, sold by the pint, quart, or gal­lon, but be­cause they have a ten­dency to set­tle pretty quickly in the bucket, what you thought was a gal­lon is now more like just over half a gal­lon, so the pound mea­sure­ment is prob­a­bly the fairest way for both the picker and cus­tomer.

Par­tridge­ber­ries, on the other hand, are gen­er­ally sold tra­di­tion­ally by the gal­lon, which ev­ery­one knows, un­less you are re­tired school teacher, is 16 cups. If you are sell­ing by the gal­lon, then that would be 16 cups, doesn’t mat­ter if it is a gal­lon of al­ready eaten berries, a gal­lon of wa­ter or a gal­lon of lead, it still takes 16 cups to make up a gal­lon. An Im­pe­rial gal­lon of wa­ter is just over 10.lbs., mer­cury is 135 lbs.

So, to the point, if you are buy­ing a gal­lon of berries from a road­side stand, or wher­ever, don’t take the ven­der’s word that there is a gal­lon in small beef bucket. Mea­sure your berries to make sure that you are get­ting what the ven­der says you are get­ting. Many peo­ple are buy­ing the stan­dard beef bucket of berries by the road­side for a gal­lon, only to find out that they have bought 14 cups in­stead of 16 cups. This is a dis­hon­est sales pitch by the pick­ers, and the un­sus­pect­ing buy­ers are be­ing gipped.

So, know what you are buy­ing, know that there are 16 cups to a gal­lon, mea­sure, mea­sure, mea­sure. Now of course if the berries are be­ing sold by weight in­stead of vol­ume, and ad­ver­tised ac­cord­ingly, you know what you are get­ting .

I know this first hand. Just re­cently I bought ‘6 gal­lons’ of par­tridge berries from a re­tired school teacher, only to find out that there are only 14 cups in his gal­lon, but on ques­tion­ing he did tell me that he ‘had heard about that some­where’. His ex­pla­na­tion, there’s five pounds in a gal­lon of par­tridge berries. NO, there is 16 cups to a gal­lon, which is closer to seven pounds per gal­lon.

This may sound triv­ial to some, but I don’t like be­ing in­ten­tion­ally ripped off by some­one who doesn’t know the dif­fer­ence be­tween square vol­ume and weight. So, buyer be­ware, and ven­der; be more up front with your cus­tomers. You will get more miles out of be­ing fare than you will from try­ing to rip un­sus­pect­ing cus­tomers off.

Ray Hynes Bris­tol’s Hope

“This may sound triv­ial to some, but I don’t like be­ing in­ten­tion­ally ripped off by some­one who doesn’t know the dif­fer­ence be­tween square vol­ume and weight.”

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