TO­DAY IN HIS­TORY

The Daily Press (Timmins) - - NEWS -

IN 1832, the world’s first horse-drawn street­car hit the streets in New York. It held 30 pas­sen­gers who paid 12-anda-half cents for the fare.

IN 1849, Toronto be­came the seat of the Cana­dian gov­ern­ment af­ter a mob burned the Par­lia­ment build­ings in Mon­treal ear­lier in the year.

IN 1891, Sir Fred­er­ick Bant­ing, co-dis­cov­erer of in­sulin and No­bel Prize win­ner, was born in Al­lis­ton, Ont.

IN 1907, chil­dren’s writer Astrid Lind­gren was born in Swe­den. The cre­ator of the braided, free-think­ing Pippi Long­stock­ing, died Jan. 28, 2002.

IN 1922, the BBC be­gan send­ing out its first daily ra­dio pro­gram from Alexan­dra Palace in Lon­don.

IN 1940, dur­ing the Sec­ond World War, Ger­man bombers de­stroyed most of the English city of Coven­try.

IN 1955, a four-month strike ended at the de Hav­il­land Air­craft plant in Toronto.

IN 1960, the Na­tional Re­search Coun­cil an­nounced the for­ma­tion of a Med­i­cal Re­search Coun­cil.

IN 1962, Sioux Rock, de­pict­ing In­dian leg­ends, was found at Port Arthur, Ont. (now part of Thun­der Bay).

IN 1963, an un­der­wa­ter vol­canic erup­tion started near Ire­land. Even­tu­ally, it formed an is­land nearly two kilo­me­tres in length.

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