Ge­netic glitch ups im­po­tence risk

re­searchers in new study aim to find out how such DNA vari­a­tions af­fect con­di­tion

The Daily Press (Timmins) - - LIFE - MAL­COLM RIT­TER

NEW YORK — sci­en­tists say they’ve lo­cated the first well-doc­u­mented ge­netic glitch that in­creases a man’s risk of im­po­tence, a step that might some­day lead to new treat­ments.

Most im­po­tence isn’t caused by ge­net­ics but rather things like obe­sity, di­a­betes, heart disease, smok­ing, drug and al­co­hol use, stress or anx­i­ety.

but in a study just re­leased by the Pro­ceed­ings of the Na­tional academy of sciences, re­searchers say they lo­cated a spot in hu­man DNA where ge­netic vari­a­tion might boost a man’s risk by about 25 per cent.

they found sta­tis­ti­cal ev­i­dence for that by look­ing in the ge­netic makeup of about 36,600 men, and con­firmed it in a sim­i­lar study of 222,300 other men. lab tests then sug­gested that vari­a­tion might af­fect the ac­tiv­ity of a nearby gene that’s known to be in­volved in sex­ual func­tion­ing.

Now sci­en­tists want to ex­plore how such vari­a­tion af­fects risk of the con­di­tion, said eric Jor­gen­son, a re­searcher at kaiser Per­ma­nente North­ern cal­i­for­nia in Oak­land and lead au­thor of the pa­per. it may in­ter­fere with the func­tion­ing of cer­tain brain cir­cuits, he said.

he said dis­cov­er­ing a bi­o­log­i­cal ex­pla­na­tion could give clues to de­vel­op­ing new treat­ments for im­po­tence, also known as erec­tile dys­func­tion.

Getty iM­AGes/iS­Tock­PhoTo

Most im­po­tence isn’t caused by ge­net­ics but rather things like obe­sity, di­a­betes, heart disease, smok­ing, drug and al­co­hol use, stress or anx­i­ety.

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