STRINGING IT TO­GETHER

Sum­mer­side trio still build­ing gui­tars - one year later

The Guardian (Charlottetown) - - THE ISLAND - BY MILLICENT MCKAY millicent.mckay@jour­nal­pi­oneer.com

Harold Noye qui­etly picks the strings.

John Camp­bell starts strum­ming along­side as Wayne Gal­lant picks up a third guitar.

“One…two…three…” says Noye as the trio starts into a twangy tune.

More than a year since be­gin­ning their mu­si­cal en­ter­prise, the group is still play­ing on gui­tars they make them­selves.

“We’ve moved into a new lo­ca­tion. It’s given us some more space to work with,” ex­plained Gal­lant, who now houses the trio’s project in his work­shop.

They have also de­signed a tool that al­lows them to build a fret board them­selves.

“Be­fore, we had to or­der them in from the United States. It would cost us around $300 for three boards, but now we can buy one board of rough wood and make three fret boards out of it for around $20,” said Noye, who does the mea­surements and cut­ting for the frets.

Camp­bell nod­ded, adding, “It saves you money when you’re build­ing the pieces of your guitar.”

Last year, they each had their own pieces of wood for mak­ing Martin and Way­lynn gui­tars.

This time around they made three gui­tars from the same blocks of wood.

“They’re pretty much sis­ter gui­tars,” said Gal­lant.

He added, “The pieces come from the same boards that started as a rough piece of wood and have now been turned into gui­tars.

“But ev­ery year it’s a lit­tle bit dif­fer­ent. We get dif­fer­ent tools and try new things as we go.”

Noye likes the fact that no mat­ter how many gui­tars are made they same way, they’ll al­ways sound dif­fer­ent.

“You can fol­low the same pat­tern, use the same tech­niques and tools, but they will al­ways sound dif­fer­ent. And what’s neat is that you can play around with dif­fer­ent parts of the in­stru­ment and try some­thing new. It’s a great way to spend re­tire­ment.”

Camp­bell says their tech­niques have im­proved over the year.

“We’re al­ways get­ting a lit­tle bit bet­ter as we go. A big part of build­ing an in­stru­ment is you have to take your time and you have to have a pas­sion for it.

“You can’t rush through build­ing an in­stru­ment. We took about 100 hours to work as a team to build our gui­tars.” Noye agreed.

“In this case, mea­sure three or four times and then cut once, don’t mea­sure once and then try to fix your mis­take. If you were to lay a piece of the board on a rough sur­face you could dent your board and there is no fix­ing that.”

Camp­bell added it’s in­cred­i­ble how much a per­son can learn by build­ing some­thing.

“If we knew what we know now, when we were 18, we would be masters by now.

“There’s some­thing about be­ing able to say that you’re play­ing an in­stru­ment you built your­self. It’s very sat­is­fy­ing.”

“You can fol­low the same pat­tern, use the same tech­niques and tools, but they will al­ways sound dif­fer­ent. And what’s neat is that you can play around with dif­fer­ent parts of the in­stru­ment and try some­thing new. It’s a great way to spend re­tire­ment.” Harold Noye

Sum­mer­side trio happy to still be build­ing gui­tars — one year later

MILLICENT MCKAY/JOUR­NAL PI­O­NEER

John Camp­bell, left, Wayne Gal­lant and Harold Noye take some time out of mak­ing gui­tars to plays ones they have made.

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