The cruise con­trol on my 1988 Oldsmo­bile fluc­tu­ates when in use. Who can I bring it to?

The Hamilton Spectator - - WHEELS - DEN­NIS O’SULLIVAN

QUES­TION

I have a ques­tion about au­to­matic car starters. The other day, my son, who is five years old, ac­cessed my keys and used the re­mote to start the car. Is there any way that one can dis­con­nect the re­mote starter to make sure that this does not hap­pen again. Also, you should warn your read­ers about re­mote starters be­cause if the car had been in the garage dur­ing the night­time, we could all have been as­phyx­i­ated.

AN­SWER

Yes, you can dis­con­nect the re­mote starter but the sim­plest so­lu­tion would be to put your keys in a se­cured area so that a five-year-old boy can­not ac­cess them. Most re­mote starters are de­signed to shut the en­gine down be­tween fif­teen to twenty min­utes so it could not have run all night as you feared. How­ever, a faulty re­mote starter or an im­proper in­stal­la­tion of the af­ter mar­ket re­mote starter could cause a dan­ger­ous sit­u­a­tion such as you sug­gested. It might be a good idea to test the op­er­a­tion of your car’s re­mote starter to make sure that it does shut down as it is de­signed to do.

QUES­TION

I had the wind­shield re­placed on my 2002 Cava­lier and af­ter one week, the wind­shield started to leak. I went back to the glass in­staller and they told me that there would not be any war­ranty on the glass in­stal­la­tion be­cause it was a body leak and not the fault of the wind­shield in­stal­la­tion. I called an­other glass com­pany and they told me that if it was an in­stal­la­tion prob­lem, it should be cov­ered un­der war­ranty. Would you be able to get the glass com­pany to re­place my wind­shield again and this time, prop­erly seal it? They have of­fered to re­in­stall the wind­shield at their cost again if I do fur­ther body re­pairs but they should have told me that be­fore they re­placed my wind­shield. I do not think that I should pay any­thing for their faulty work. I would like your opin­ion.

Don from Paris

AN­SWER

The glass shop is not re­fus­ing to re­seal your car’s wind­shield, based on your as­ser­tions of their faulty work­man­ship but is re­fus­ing to re­seal the wind­shield again, based on the in­ad­e­quate body re­pairs that were made to the frame of the wind­shield. When they re­moved your car’s wind­shield, they told you that it was rusted around the wind­shield frame and that it needed to be re­paired. You claimed that a body shop did the re­pairs but you re­fused to tell the glass shop which body shop had done the re­pairs. The glass shop then told you that the re­pairs were hap­haz­ard and that the wind­shield might leak. You then told the glass shop to do the best that they could but the wind­shield did even­tu­ally start to leak around the body re­pairs. Re­mov­ing the wind­shield again and re­seal­ing it for you at their cost, af­ter you get the body re­pairs done prop­erly around the wind­shield frame, is a good deal for you and I rec­om­mend that you take their of­fer.

QUES­TION

The cruise con­trol on my 1988 Oldsmo­bile fluc­tu­ates when in use. I have had the car to my me­chanic but he does not seem to know where to start look­ing fro the prob­lem since the car is well beyond his age. It seems to work bet­ter when I have it set to fifty kilo­me­ters but when I set it for high­way speeds, it starts to fluc­tu­ate and then ac­tu­ally cuts out. Have you had any ex­pe­ri­ence with this and if not, would you rec­om­mend some­one who would know some­thing about the cruise con­trol on an older car?

Thanks Bob from Burling­ton

AN­SWER

Vacuum as­sist op­er­ates the cruise con­trol on that car and I would first start by look­ing to make sure that the cruise con­trol vacuum reser­voir is get­ting vacuum. If you find that the vacuum line to the cruise con­trol vacuum reser­voir is not pinched or leak­ing then I sus­pect that you have a leak some­where in the cruise con­trol vacuum reser­voir. A pinched or leak­ing vacuum line or a leak­ing cruise con­trol vacuum reser­voir will cause the car’s speed to fluc­tu­ate when it loses and re­gains its vacuum. If you are a mem­ber of an Auto Club, ask them for one of their ap­proved garages that can as­sist you.

PS Read­ers, Please be ad­vised that all emails can­not be an­swered. Send your ques­tions (be sure to in­clude your ad­dress) by email to: den­nis.osul­li­van@co­geco.ca or mail: Box 10019, Wi­nona, ON L8E 5R1

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