Chang­ing the form and func­tion of lob­bies

The Hamilton Spectator - - TRAVEL -

In th­ese days of lap­tops and mo­bile of­fices, peo­ple like to work alone — to­gether. Ho­tel lob­bies are ac­com­mo­dat­ing that, of­fer­ing lots of work spa­ces — as well as plugs and free WiFi — with easy ac­cess to snacks, caf­feine and cock­tails.

At the Hy­att Cen­tric on Mag­nif­i­cent Mile, for ex­am­ple, the lobby is the kind of place where you could spend days on end. It’s filled with play­ful lo­cal art, and in­cludes a li­brary and dozens of com­fort­able chairs and ta­bles, all of which spill into the bar, which spills into the restau­rant, with no walls or bar­ri­ers sep­a­rat­ing the spa­ces.

Gone is the tra­di­tional lobby at Radis­son RED: The brand ban­ished the front desk.

“It’s cre­at­ing this im­me­di­ate bar­rier be­tween you and the guests, and I think the younger au­di­ences are a lot more in­for­mal by na­ture,” An­der­son says.

At the Minneapolis lo­ca­tion, guests can check in us­ing the app on their phone, then use the phone as the key to get into the room. Should some­one need help with check­ing in, An­der­son says, staffers are walk­ing around with iPads in hand.

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