The beauty of ev­ery­day things

Carnegie Gallery show re­minds us of the plea­sure and power of orig­i­nal art

The Hamilton Spectator - - Go Arts & Life - Kren­wald@gmail.com In­sta­gram:@kathyren­wald

You only have to walk into the Atrium Arts­pace at Carnegie Gallery in Dun­das to see how paint­ings can turn a spare space into some­thing warm and wel­com­ing.

The nar­row gallery with soar­ing walls has been fine­tuned to the hu­man scale with an in­ven­tive show called “The Art of the En­try.” In a series of vi­gnettes, won­der­ful still life paint­ings have been paired with fur­ni­ture and ac­ces­sories. The group­ings show how small spa­ces, like front en­tries, come alive with orig­i­nal art.

The show’s cu­ra­tor, artist Jody Joseph, says the way a gallery dis­plays work in a spare set­ting is in­tim­i­dat­ing for some peo­ple.

“It’s hard for peo­ple to imag­ine how the work might look in their own home, and yet I some­times felt that it looks bet­ter in a home set­ting than it does on a spare wall.”

Joseph took her idea for a col­lab­o­ra­tion to Lorna Parcher of Gra­ham & Brooks — Home, Gar­den, Cot­tage in Dun­das. Parcher loved the con­cept.

“We jumped at the chance. It is such a nat­u­ral thing to have beau­ti­ful art work dis­played in a home­like en­vi­ron­ment. We put to­gether the vi­gnettes that lent them­selves to the space and al­lowed the art­work to shine in each set­ting.”

In the first vi­gnette, a wing­back chair, lamp and small ta­ble are teamed with two paint­ings by Jan Ken­drick. As Joseph says, “they speak to each other.” The do­mes­tic scenes por­trayed in the work com­ple­ment the pieces from Gra­ham & Brooks.

Ken­drick be­lieves that orig­i­nal art is more in­ti­mate, and it is in­vested with per­sonal sto­ries.

“The phone you see in my paint­ing was left to me by my dear late un­cle, who worked in the com­mu­ni­ca­tions busi­ness for many years.”

Most of the paint­ings are oil or acrylic on can­vas. They don’t need frames, so they are easy to hang and to move. Joseph also used easels from a dol­lar store, and pic­ture shelves to dis­play smaller work.

“In your house it’s great to mix it up, put your favourite piece away for a while and then bring it out and hang it in a new place. It’s like the de­signer’s idea of chang­ing decor for the sea­sons.”

In an­other set­ting with a nar­row ta­ble that could dou­ble as a break­fast bar, a Jan Ken­drick still life hangs be­side Joan Hey­erichs’ sump­tu­ous de­pic­tion of fish on a plat­ter.

“Still life in par­tic­u­lar is a very nice pick for the kitchen,” Joseph says. “The sub­ject of food works well here with other kitchen ac­ces­sories on the ta­ble.”

The paint­ings span an af­ford­able range of prices, $150 to $800. To have high-qual­ity work from lo­cal artists de­liv­ers the sort of sat­is­fac­tion and en­joy­ment not eas­ily found in mass mar­ket re­pro­duc­tions.

A vi­gnette fea­tur­ing the work of Iris McDermott de­picts the sun­lit and joy­ful in­te­rior spa­ces in our homes. Hang­ing above a small desk with a pale blue chair, McDermott’s scenes of vases, flow­ers, chairs and ta­bles are free and fresh.

“I paint what I love,” the artist says. And as Joseph notes, “They have their own in­ter­nal light, even on a grey day.”

“The Art of the En­try” con­tin­ues to Nov. 25. It is a thought­ful and in­ti­mate show that re­minds us of the plea­sure and power of orig­i­nal art.

“They are a beau­ti­ful pre­sen­ta­tion of ev­ery­day things in the home,” Joseph says.

In the first vi­gnette a wing­back chair, a lamp and small ta­ble pair with two paint­ings by Jan Ken­drick. As Joseph says, “they speak to each other.” The do­mes­tic scenes por­trayed in the work com­ple­ment the pieces cho­sen from Gra­ham & Brooks.

PHO­TOS BY GARY YOKOYAMA THE HAMIL­TON SPEC­TA­TOR

In an­other set­ting with a nar­row ta­ble that could dou­ble as a break­fast bar, a Jan Ken­drick still life hangs be­side Joan Hey­erichs’ sump­tu­ous de­pic­tion of fish on a plat­ter.

Rus­tic bench, coat hooks on barn­board and Joan Hey­erichs’ scenic paint­ing of a game­board, fruit and re­fresh­ments.

KATHY RENWALD

PHO­TOS BY GARY YOKOYAMA THE HAMIL­TON SPEC­TA­TOR

A vi­gnette fea­tur­ing the work of Iris McDermott de­picts the sun­lit and joy­ful, in­te­rior spa­ces in our homes. Hang­ing above a small desk with a pale blue chair, McDermott’s scenes of vases, flow­ers, chairs and ta­bles are free and fresh.

The ad­di­tion of orig­i­nal art makes this group­ing both beau­ti­ful and use­ful.

The nar­row Atrium Arts­pace at Carnegie Gallery is ideal for il­lus­trat­ing group­ings of fur­ni­ture and art.

Flow­ers and fruit are clas­sic sub­jects in Jan Ken­drick’s “A Pleas­ant Break,” a paint­ing that would look at home in a kitchen.

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