TO­DAY IN HIS­TORY

The Niagara Falls Review - - NEWS -

In 547, Ital­ian monk Bene­dict, au­thor of the Bene­dic­tine rule which es­tab­lished the pat­tern for Euro­pean monas­tic life through the Mid­dle Ages, died at Monte Cassino. In 1965, Pope Paul VI pro­claimed him the pa­tron saint of Europe.

In 1556, Thomas Cran­mer, au­thor of the “Book of Com­mon Prayer” and the church­man who pro­posed a method by which Henry VIII could divorce Cather­ine of Aragon with­out dis­pen­sa­tion from Rome, was burned at the stake by or­der of the Catholic queen, Mary I. Mary -- Henry and Cather­ine’s daugh­ter -- at­tempted to re­store Catholi­cism as Eng­land’s of­fi­cial re­li­gion, as op­posed to the Angli­can­ism that al­lowed Henry to divorce her mother.

In 1617, Po­co­hon­tas, an In­dian princess who mar­ried English set­tler John Rolfe, one of the founders of a colony in Vir­gina, died in Eng­land at age 22.

In 1621, English set­tlers signed their first treaty with In­di­ans at Ply­mouth, Mass.

In 1666, In­ten­dant Jean Talon counted 3,000 peo­ple in Canada’s first cen­sus.

In 1685, Jo­hann Se­bas­tian Bach, one of the great­est and most in­flu­en­tial com­posers in the Western world, was born in Eise­nach, Ger­many.

In 1804, the French civil code, known as the Napoleonic code, was adopted.

In 1821, the North West Com­pany agreed to merge with its fur-trad­ing ri­val, the Hud­son’s Bay Com­pany, ef­fec­tive June 1st.

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