TO­DAY IN HIS­TORY

The Observer (Sarnia) - - NEWS -

In 1792, France de­clared war on Aus­tria, start­ing the French Revo­lu­tion­ary Wars.

In 1841, “The Mur­ders in the Rue Morgue,” by Edgar Al­lan Poe was pub­lished. It’s con­sid­ered the first-ever de­tec­tive story.

In 1889, Adolf Hitler was born in Brau­nau am Inn, Aus­tria.

In 1890, Mau­rice Du­p­lessis was born in Trois-Rivieres, Que. He served as Que­bec’s premier for 19 years from 1936 un­til his death in 1959.

In 1902, French sci­en­tists Marie and Pierre Curie suc­ceeded in iso­lat­ing the ra­dioac­tive el­e­ment ra­dium.

In 1907, Fort Wil­liam and Port Arthur, Ont., were in­cor­po­rated as cities. They merged to be­come Thun­der Bay in 1970.

In 1910, Par­lia­ment passed a bill set­ting up the Cana­dian Navy. The bill, given Royal Assent on May 4, called for a De­part­ment of Naval Ser­vice to be ad­min­is­tered by the Min­is­ter of Ma­rine and Fish­eries. It also called for a per­ma­nent force, a naval re­serve to be called up in emer­gen­cies, a vol­un­teer re­serve and a naval col­lege.

In 1912, the Ir­ish-born au­thor of “Drac­ula,” Bram Stoker, died at age 55.

In 1945, dur­ing the Sec­ond World War, al­lied forces took con­trol of the Ger­man cities of Nurem­berg and Stuttgart.

In 1949, sci­en­tists at the Mayo Clinic an­nounced they’d suc­ceeded in syn­the­siz­ing a hor­mone found to be use­ful in treat­ing rheuma­toid arthri­tis. The sub­stance was named “cor­ti­sone.”

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