To­day in his­tory

The Western Star - - EDITORIAL -

On this date:

In 1483, Mar­tin Luther, the Au­gus­tinian monk who be­came the founder and leader of the Ger­man Re­for­ma­tion, was born in Eisleben, Sax­ony.

In 1775, the U.S. Marines were or­ga­nized un­der the au­thor­ity of the Con­ti­nen­tal Con­gress.

In 1796, Rus­sian Em­press Cather­ine the Great died.

In 1852, Par­lia­ment was dis­solved at Que­bec, ow­ing to an out­break of cholera.

In 1853, the Great West­ern Rail­way line, run­ning 69 kilo­me­tres from the Ni­a­gara Sus­pen­sion Bridge to Hamil­ton, was opened.

In 1856, a tele­graph line was opened be­tween New­found­land and New York.

In 1871, one of his­tory’s great­est searches ended when Amer­i­can news­man Henry Mor­ton Stan­ley found British ex­plorer Dr. David Liv­ing­stone at Ujiji in cen­tral Africa. Stan­ley’s fa­mous ques­tion, “Dr. Liv­ing­stone, I pre­sume?” were the first words Liv­ing­stone had heard from a white man in five years. Stan­ley had been com­mis­sioned by the New York Her­ald to find Liv­ing­stone, who had been feared dead for four years.

In 1932, Fos­ter He­witt made his first Hockey Night in Canada broad­cast. Bos­ton and Toronto tied 1-1.

In 1940, the Trans-At­lantic Ferry Ser­vice be­gan op­er­a­tions, trans­port­ing planes, men, and sup­plies from Canada via Goose Bay and Gan­der, N.L., to Bri­tain.

In 1951, the world’s first “no op­er­a­tor” long-dis­tance tele­phone call was made by Mayor Leslie Den­ny­ing of En­gle­wood, N.J., to Mayor Frank Os­borne of Alameda, Calif.

In 1953, Canada’s mil­i­tary base in Soest, Ger­many was opened.

In 1954, the U.S. Ma­rine Corps Me­mo­rial, de­pict­ing the rais­ing of the Amer­i­can flag on Iwo Jima in 1945, was ded­i­cated by Pres­i­dent Eisen­hower in Ar­ling­ton, Va.

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