RIDE YOUR WAY TO RUN FIT­NESS 1. LEG SPEED 2. LEG STRENGTH 3. CORE WARM-UP CORE (5X) STRENGTH (5X) LEG SPEED (5X) COOL-DOWN

CY­CLING AND THE IN­JURED TRIATH­LETE COM­MON TERM

Triathlon Magazine Canada - - FEATURES - BY ADAM JOHN­STON

TRIATH­LETES OF­TEN GET in­jured from their run train­ing. Swim­ming and cy­cling can lead to in­juries, too, but not as fre­quently as run­ning. When you’re in­jured, the key is to main­tain (or de­velop) a pos­i­tive men­tal out­look on the sit­u­a­tion and act ac­cord­ingly. For­tu­nately, be­ing a triath­lete means you have one of the best tools to help ex­pe­dite re­cov­ery from a run in­jury: your bike.

Pro­vided that your run in­jury doesn’t pre­vent you from cy­cling, there are three key com­po­nents of your run­ning which you can hone while us­ing your bike:

Many of us have a ca­dence me­ter on their bike, but how many of us know our ca­dence when run­ning? While ev­ery­one is dif­fer­ent, the gen­er­ally rec­om­mended ca­dence on the run is 80 to 90 steps per foot per minute (80 to 90 rpm). You can main­tain and even im­prove your run­ning leg speed by in­cor­po­rat­ing high-ca­dence in­ter­vals on the bike.

Run­ning up hills re­quires strength. Run­ning off the bike re­quires strength. Strong run­ning comes from strong glutes, hip flex­ors, quads, ham­strings and lower leg mus­cles (those be­low the knee). Most of th­ese mus­cles can be trained ef­fec­tively on the bike with low ca­dence, high-re­sis­tance in­ter­vals.

Have you ever tried one-legged cy­cling? It’s gen­er­ally an un­pleas­ant ex­pe­ri­ence. But it is a train­able skill (one that can im­prove with prac­tice over time). One-legged cy­cling is fan­tas­tic at work­ing the hip flex­ors, which trans­lates into im­proved run­ning.

Try this time-ef­fi­cient 60-minute in­door trainer ride to ad­dress all three is­sues above:

10 min­utes easy

30 sec­onds right leg (Zone 1–2)

30 sec­onds left leg (Zone 1–2)

1:30 both legs (Zone 1–2)

2 min­utes at 50 to 60 rpm at high power/torque (Zone 4)

2 min­utes at easy power/ef­fort at 85 to 95 rpm (Zone 1–2) 1 minute high ca­dence at low power (Zone 1). Add 5 rpm per in­ter­val, such that the 6th and fi­nal in­ter­val is max­i­mum-ca­dence ef­fort.

1 minute at 75 to 85 rpm re­cov­ery (Zone 1)

5 min­utes easy

ZONE

Zone 1

Zone 2

Zone 3

Zone 4

Zone 5

Re­cov­ery

Base

Tempo

Thresh­old

VO2 Max

AP­PROX­I­MATE EF­FORT

Ridicu­lously easy

All day ef­fort

A cou­ple of hours ef­fort

45 to 75 minute ef­fort

5 to 8 min­utes

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