Tran­si­tion sets

Triathlon Magazine Canada - - WARM-UP T1 -

BRICK WORK­OUTS ARE TRIATHLON-SPE­CIFIC WORK­OUTS THAT COM­BINE SWIM AND BIKE, BIKE AND RUN OR SWIM, BIKE AND RUN EF­FORTS. THESE SES­SIONS PRO­VIDE RACE-SPE­CIFIC TRAIN­ING FOR TRIATHLON RAC­ING. FOR LONG-COURSE ATH­LETES, SES­SIONS THAT TAR­GET FA­TIGUE RE­SIS­TANCE, NUTRI­TION TOL­ER­ANCE AND PAC­ING ARE IM­POR­TANT. THIS IS A TWO-DAY BRICK WORK­OUT DE­SIGNED TO AD­DRESS ALL THREE OF THESE TRAIN­ING COM­PO­NENTS. BREAK­ING THE WORK UP OVER TWO DAYS AL­LOWS FOR MORE QUAL­ITY TRAIN­ING AND SAVES THE AC­TUAL RACE EF­FORT FOR RACE DAY.

Day One

The first day in­cor­po­rates a long bike ride with a short run. The ride can be four to seven hours. This work­out sim­u­lates a full-dis­tance bike leg thanks to the du­ra­tion, the need for race-spe­cific fu­elling and event-spe­cific po­si­tion­ing (you should stay in the aero po­si­tion as much as pos­si­ble). For ath­letes new to full-dis­tance rac­ing, a long zone two (easy) ride is enough. For ex­pe­ri­enced ath­letes, 30 to 60 min­utes of the sec­ond half of the ride should be at full-dis­tance race pace. This is a test of pac­ing, fu­elling and fa­tigue re­sis­tance – the ses­sion will give you a good in­di­ca­tion of whether your nutri­tion plan and train­ing are on track for race day.

After the bike, tran­si­tion to a 15to 60-minute run. Strong run­ners with a lot of mileage can push this run to an hour, while less ex­pe­ri­enced run­ners should aim for 15 to 30 min­utes. Easy run­ning is enough, but you can also in­clude some fiveminute re­peats of 20 sec­onds quick turnover/40 sec­onds easy to work on your leg speed and help you with your race day prepa­ra­tion.

The sec­ond day is a long run day. The Satur­day bike/run brick cre­ates lin­ger­ing fa­tigue. A night’s sleep does not pro­vide full re­cov­ery, so the Sun­day run feels like a con­tin­u­a­tion of the day be­fore’s brick work. As a re­sult, less run­ning is re­quired be­fore the fa­tigue sim­u­lates the last third of a full-dis­tance marathon.

Start­ing with 30 to 60 min­utes of easy run­ning, the work­out is one to four by 5 km, or 30 min­utes at goal Iron­man pace (which­ever is shorter). The to­tal vol­ume of run­ning is less than 2½ hours. There is sim­i­lar ben­e­fit do­ing more easy run­ning be­fore you do the qual­ity ef­fort (mak­ing your legs tired), so be con­ser­va­tive with the num­ber of in­ter­vals. Very fit and ex­pe­ri­enced run­ners can build up to four by 5 km at goal pace with 5 min­utes rest be­tween ef­forts, aim­ing to even split all four.

No mat­ter what marathon split you are aim­ing for, this work­out should still take less than 2½ hours. Ath­letes in­cor­po­rat­ing a run and walk pro­to­col in their rac­ing plan should fol­low that plan dur­ing this work­out. In­stead of mak­ing long runs even longer, you can in­cor­po­rate hik­ing into your pro­gram. Hik­ing is a safe way to add mileage to pre­pare for a longer marathon. You can add some hikes to your plan and make your long run work­outs higher qual­ity and less than 150 min­utes.

The first time you try this, start with easy run­ning and be con­ser­va­tive with the 5 km re­peats. A two-hour run on tired legs, at an easy pace, may be enough for the first time. In­cor­po­rate race-spe­cific marathon fu­elling and re­al­is­tic pac­ing. If your goal pace in not re­al­is­tic, you will not be able to hit that pace on your first 5 km re­peat. The trick to pac­ing is find­ing a rhythm, so try to run by feel as much as pos­si­ble.

This week­end brick is a great way to get a safe, long-dis­tance triathlon ef­fort in over two days. Break­ing up the work­outs with in­com­plete rest en­sures you get a lot of qual­ity in the train­ing with­out cre­at­ing ex­cess fa­tigue. That said, this week­end of work de­mands sig­nif­i­cant rest, so plan­ning for three to six days of re­cov­ery af­ter­ward is im­por­tant. One of these week­ends in a three to four week train­ing cy­cle is more than enough.

Me­lanie Mc­Quaid won the ITU Cross World Cham­pi­onship last year. In ad­di­tion to her suc­cess­ful pro ca­reer in the sport, she is also a renowned coach from Vic­to­ria.

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