Work ev­ery­thing out at Ap­ple Val­ley CrossFit in Cold­brook

‘It is a wel­com­ing door when you walk in here,’ says owner

Valley Journal Advertiser - - SPORTS - SARA ERIC­S­SON KINGSCOUNTYNEWS.CA

There is no one-size fits all ap­proach to fit­ness, and that’s why these four new gym own­ers are en­cour­ag­ing ev­ery­one to try one that in­cludes it all.

Two cou­ples - Jor­dan and Chelsea Apos­to­leris and Emily and James Martell – are now all co-own­ers of Ap­ple Val­ley CrossFit in Cold­brook, a space that pro­motes work­outs geared to­wards “func­tional fit­ness,” or fit­ness that im­proves ev­ery­day life with men­tal and phys­i­cal gains, ac­cord­ing to the own­ers.

The two cou­ples both train and coach at the gym, and are as much a part of work­outs as their class­mates. It’s the re­la­tion­ship they’ve forged with them that in­spired them to pur­chase the busi­ness in the first place.

“I’ve lost 85 pounds since join­ing crossfit, and I can hon­estly say I could not have done it with­out my peers cheer­ing me on. We’re build­ing a com­mu­nity here – that’s what this is all about for us,” says James Martell.

All four ath­letes con­nected through train­ing at the gym. As both men be­gan work­ing out to­gether, they started jok­ing that they’d like to own it one day.

Now, that joke has be­come a re­al­ity, and all four ath­letes now co-own the An­napo­lis Val­ley’s only crossfit box – what they call the area of bars, rings and other in­stru­ments used in the sport, which preaches a stripped-down ap­proach to gym work­outs.

Tread­mills and other ma­chines are re­placed with mon­key bars and freeweights – “a rudi­men­tary ap­proach to fit­ness,” says new­lyc­er­ti­fied coach James Martell.

Jor­dan Apos­to­leris says this is why CrossFit of­fers such a unique work­out – speed, agility, strength and car­dio are all in­clud­ing in all classes.

“Crossfit is huge right now. They’re spread all over the prov­ince, and they all are suc­cess­ful. So it just seemed like a no-brainer – too good of an op­por­tu­nity to pass up,” he says.

The gym of­fers sev­eral work­out times per day, for an hour each: a work­out is listed on the board, and ev­ery­one par­tic­i­pat­ing at that hour com­pletes it to­gether.

“If you’re pick­ing up a heavy box, car­ry­ing gro­ceries, bend­ing over to pick up your kid, pulling your­self out of a hole – the idea be­hind crossfit is that you’re do­ing a body weight move­ment, and work­ing your whole body,” says Apos­to­leris.

And while the sport is of­ten as­so­ci­ated with peo­ple Jor­dan Apos­to­leris calls “meat­heads, or su­per ath­letes,” he says it’s not the case at all.

“We all do the same work­outs for the same amount of time, but they’re scaled to each per­son’s in­di­vid­ual abil­ity,” he says.

Apos­to­leris is the gym’s most ac­com­plished crossfit ath­lete, but says his favourite days are still when peo­ple ar­rive to try the sport for the first time.

“It is a wel­com­ing door when you walk in here. There are no ex­pec­ta­tions, only peo­ple who are happy to see new peo­ple. We want to en­cour­age peo­ple to bet­ter them­selves men­tal­ity and phys­i­cally, and bring that pos­i­tive en­ergy home to fam­ily and friends,” he says.

Emily Martell, too, re­calls feel­ing self-con­scious about her own ath­letic abil­ity, un­til she dis­cov­ered classes were made up of ath­letes of many dif­fer­ent abil­i­ties.

She says the club’s un­of­fi­cial rule is that all those work­ing out cheer each other on un­til the last per­son has fin­ished.

“There have been days where I thought there was no way I could keep go­ing, but I did, and it was be­cause there was ac­count­abil­ity – ev­ery­one else stayed, so I did too,” said Emily.

All four agree it’s this mo­ti­va­tion and this sense of com­mu­nity that drove them to pur­chase the busi­ness in the first place. All four have full-time jobs out­side the gym, and say the pur­chase was only pos­si­ble with each of them all in.

“We’re all very mo­ti­vated and hard­work­ing, and ex­cited and keen about this op­por­tu­nity,” says Chelsea Apos­to­leris.

This ap­proach is also what they say makes crossfit so unique and spe­cial, be­cause ev­ery­one is in it to­gether.

And even with the team en­vi­ron­ment, new­com­ers are al­ways made wel­come when they par­take. Chelsea Apos­to­leris says she can vouch for this, since she is still rel­a­tively new to the sport.

“It’s a very sup­port­ive com­mu­nity. You can dig down deep, ac­com­plish that move­ment, and ev­ery­one is cheer­ing for you,” she says.

“Ac­com­plish­ing a chal­leng­ing goal to­gether gets you through it.”

To con­tact Ap­ple Val­ley CrossFit, call 902-690-5259 or visit the gym’s Face­book page.

SUB­MIT­TED

Jor­dan Apos­to­leris is the gym’s top crossfit ath­lete, and says his favourite day is still when new peo­ple try the sport for the first time. “It is a wel­com­ing door when you walk in here. There are no ex­pec­ta­tions, only peo­ple who are happy to see new peo­ple,” he says.

SUB­MIT­TED

Emily Martell re­calls a time when she was a new­comer and doubted whether she mea­sured up. She says her peers were the only thing that kept her go­ing. “I thought there was no way I could keep go­ing, but I did, and it was be­cause there was ac­count­abil­ity – ev­ery­one else stayed, so I did too,” she says.

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