DESK­TOP AS LUNCH COUNTER.

Windsor Star - - NP -

1 NOT OUT TO LUNCH

Al­most 40 per cent of Cana­di­ans are eat­ing lunch at their desks, ac­cord­ing to a new study gaug­ing eat­ing habits. The sur­vey, con­ducted by Nova Sco­tia’s Dal­housie Univer­sity, found that 39 per cent of re­spon­dents ate at their desks, com­pared with 37 per cent at home, and 24 per cent in a cafe­te­ria or kitchen.

2 UN­DER PRES­SURE

“It re­ally speaks to how pres­sured work­ers are,” said lead au­thor Syl­vain Charlebois, a pro­fes­sor in food pol­icy at Dal­housie. “To take the time to go eat any meal at work is slowly be­com­ing a lux­ury.”

3 PACKED OFF

Charlebois and his team found that 72 per cent of re­spon­dents packed their own work lunches, while 24 per cent ei­ther bought their lunches or ate at res­tau­rants. Peo­ple in At­lantic Canada eat lunch at their desks most of­ten, at al­most 50 per cent, the study sug­gested. They’re also much more likely to eat alone, with 68 per cent re­port­ing do­ing so.

4 AT THE READY

For din­ner, Cana­di­ans are in­creas­ingly turn­ing to ready-made meals or eat­ing out, the study found. Some 41 per cent of sur­vey re­spon­dents re­ported do­ing so once or twice a week, while three per cent said they did so every day. Only 18 per cent of par­tic­i­pants said they never ate at res­tau­rants or bought ready-made meals for din­ner.

5 ‘DIS­IN­TE­GRA­TION’

Charlebois says the re­sults of the study show what he calls “a com­plete dis­in­te­gra­tion of our meal habits” and the aban­don­ment of the tra­di­tional three-mealsa-day struc­ture around which most days were sched­uled. “Lunch was the first meal to dis­ap­pear, be­cause most peo­ple are chal­lenged by work, and break­fast is next,” he said.

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