CRE­AT­ING THE PER­FECT KITCHEN IS­LAND

Do you want a sink or stove­top? One level or two? Choose your op­tions — and size — care­fully

Windsor Star - - HOMES - MELISSA RAYWORTH

In­te­rior de­signer Abbe Fen­i­more knew that adding a kitchen is­land was one of the most im­por­tant de­ci­sions she’d make in re­mod­elling her 1940s-era home. A well-de­signed kitchen is­land can of­fer stor­age space, a work sur­face, com­fort­able seat­ing — even a cook­top or spare sink.

But like so many as­pects of kitchen de­sign, it needs to be planned with ex­tra care. An item this large and cen­tral isn’t some­thing you’ll want to re­place within a few years. So Fen­i­more and her hus­band cre­ated a card­board is­land in their kitchen with pre­cise di­men­sions to live with it be­fore com­mit­ting. They tin­kered with the de­tails on its size and lo­ca­tion. They de­bated which fea­tures were nec­es­sary and which were too much of a splurge or took up too much space.

In the end, that is­land “has be­come the lit­eral hub in our home for so­cial­iz­ing,” Fen­i­more says. We’ve asked Fen­i­more, founder of the de­sign firm Stu­dio Ten 25, and two other in­te­rior de­sign­ers — Betsy Burn­ham and Jenny Kirschner — for their thoughts on great kitchen-is­land de­signs and trends.

MAP OUT THE DE­TAILS

Be­cause care­ful plan­ning is so im­por­tant, Burn­ham sug­gests work­ing with a de­signer on kitchenis­land de­sign or find­ing re­sources on­line for draw­ing up a floor plan. “You’re go­ing to need about three feet of space around it — at least three,” she says. Home­own­ers some­times end up with too crowded a kitchen if they choose an is­land that’s too large.

JENNA PEFFLEY/THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS

This ur­ban farm­house style kitchen, de­signed by Betsy Burn­ham, has an is­land that of­fers am­ple stor­age and an ex­tra prep sink.

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