Eggs give salad a pop of pro­tein

Windsor Star - - YOU - EL­LIE KRIEGER

The name mi­mosa may im­me­di­ately con­jure a cham­pagne cock­tail, but here it refers to the fluffy, sunny-yel­low egg gar­nish which, like the drink, is named for its re­sem­blance to the flow­ers of the mi­mosa tree.

Sim­ply made by grat­ing hard­boiled eggs on the large holes of a box grater, it adds panache and pro­tein when sprin­kled over steamed veg­eta­bles, av­o­cado toast, sal­ads and such.

Here it adorns a cool, creamy cu­cum­ber salad for a pretty, twotiered pre­sen­ta­tion.

I pre­fer English cu­cum­bers for the salad be­cause they have fewer seeds than other va­ri­eties and their skins are thin enough that you can leave them un­peeled, adding vi­brant colour and nu­tri­ents to the fi­nal dish.

If you use an­other type, you may want to peel them if their skins are on the tougher side.

Af­ter thinly slic­ing the cu­cum­ber, toss them with the onion, sprinkle with salt and set in a colan­der for 20 min­utes so they can ex­pel some of their wa­ter. This step, along with blot­ting them with pa­per towel, pre­vents the salad from be­com­ing watery, con­cen­trates the cu­cum­ber’s flavour and gives the vegetable a firmer, crisper tex­ture.

The cu­cum­ber and onion are then tossed in a Greek yo­gurt­based dress­ing that is light and fresh, with a de­lec­ta­ble creami­ness. Topped with the egg mi­mosa, it be­comes an el­e­gant side or veg­e­tar­ian main dish — a dish which, come to think of it, would pair well with that cham­pagne cock­tail.

TOM MCCORKLE/ THE WASH­ING­TON POST

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