Colour

Winnipeg Free Press - Section G - - HOMES -

“One of the se­crets to suc­cess­ful pat­tern mix­ing,” says New York de­signer John Chad­wick, “is continuity in the colour pal­ette. Hav­ing one shade in com­mon and oth­ers that are sim­i­lar is what ties them to­gether.”

A din­ing room he re­cently de­signed for a client has a large, me­an­der­ing flower pat­tern on the walls and plaid cur­tains at the floor-to-ceil­ing win­dows. While com­pletely dif­fer­ent from each other, they work to­gether be­cause leafy green and red dom­i­nate both.

Chad­wick com­pleted the scheme with chair up­hol­stery and a rug in a dusty gold that ref­er­ences the walls and cur­tains. Wo­ven with a raised check ef­fect, it adds tex­ture as well.

De­signer Cindy Raby favours deep, richly coloured pat­terns for dark rooms: “They add drama, warmth and com­fort.”

But she also likes the way light colours and tex­tures give rooms a crisp, airy feel­ing.

“Dark or light can be right,” she says. Ground­ing and bal­ance Also im­por­tant when us­ing pat­terns is “ground­ing” them with large swaths of solid colour, says Chad­wick — “per­haps a rug, wall or sofa, so the eye has some­thing to fo­cus on.”

Los An­ge­les-based de­signer Joe Nye tends to­ward sisal and sea­grass floor cov­er­ings. “They unify things, and hav­ing a ca­sual qual­ity pro­duce a pleas­ing jux­ta­po­si­tion with a lot of up­hol­stered fur­ni­ture,” he says.

Some­times he re­peats pat­terns in two ad­ja­cent rooms for “a nice bit of har­mony.” And it’s key, he says, to “dis­trib­ute pat­terns evenly through­out a room so it doesn’t ap­pear lop­sided.”

“One of the se­crets to suc­cess­ful pat­tern mix­ing,” says New York de­signer John Chad­wick, “is continuity in the colour pal­ette. Hav­ing one shade in com­mon and oth­ers that are sim­i­lar is

what ties them to­gether.”

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