Xin­jiang: A Silk Road High­way

Beijing (English) - - CONTENTS - Trans­lated by Scott Bray Edited by Mark Zuiderveld

A joint ap­pli­ca­tion in­scribed the Chang’an-tian­shan Silk Road Cor­ri­dor on the World Her­itage List in June 2014, which re­sulted in six World Her­itage Sites be­ing es­tab­lished in Xin­jiang.

Xin­jiang was of par­tic­u­lar geo­graphic im­por­tance along the Silk Road. Its po­si­tion as a tran­sit hub es­tab­lished the area as a cen­tre in which peo­ple com­ing from South, Western and Cen­tral Asian coun­tries could come to ex­change goods and cul­ture alike. To­day, the car­a­vans of the an­cient Silk Road have seen a mod­ern up­grade, trad­ing camels and car­a­vans for trucks and cargo trains. Yet here, sur­rounded by for­got­ten se­crets of an­cient cities, on the same road that car­ried the fa­bled Tang Dy­nasty (AD 618–907) monk Xuan­zang in his jour­ney to the west, one can still find traces of the old Silk Road. It is here where East met West through ex­change of trade and ideas.

On June 22, 2014 at the 38th ses­sion of the UNESCO World Her­itage Com­mit­tee, a joint ap­pli­ca­tion be­tween China, Kaza­khstan and Kyr­gyzs­tan in­scribed the Chang’an-tian­shan Silk Road Cor­ri­dor on the World Her­itage List. This re­sulted in six World Her­itage Sites be­ing es­tab­lished in Xin­jiang.

Gaochang, a Mil­len­nium in the West

Lo­cated within 40 kilo­me­tres (km) east of to­day’s Tur­pan, near the

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