Re­port: Na­tion’s traders clear­ing cus­toms elec­tron­i­cally

China Daily (Canada) - - BUSINESS - ByWUYIYAO wuyiyao@chi­nadaily.com.cn

The vast ma­jor­ity of the na­tion’s im­porters and ex­porters use the e-clear­ance pro­gram known as Cus­toms Pa­per­less Re­form, said a re­port re­leased in Shang­hai on Thurs­day.

The re­port, based on Price­wa­ter­house­Coop­ers LLP’s an­nual sur­vey of man­ag­ing cus­toms and in­ter­na­tional trade in China, cov­ered 400 com­pa­nies reg­is­tered in China. It found that 82 per­cent are us­ing e-clear­ance, a sharp in­crease from just 46 per­cent as re­cently as 2013.

Among the sur­vey par­tic­i­pants, 51 per­cent of com­pa­nies said they are en­gaged in pro­cess­ing trade, while the re­main­ing 49 per­cent are in­volved in gen­eral trade. Par­tic­i­pants came from many in­dus­tries, in­clud­ing in­dus­trial prod­ucts, ve­hi­cles, chem­i­cals, tech­nol­ogy, re­tail and con­sumer ser­vices, phar­ma­ceu­ti­cals and health­care.

Trade fa­cil­i­ta­tion im­proves the ef­fi­ciency of goods move­ment, re­duces sup­ply chain bar­ri­ers and low­ers the costs of lo­gis­tics while safe­guard­ing le­git­i­mate govern­ment reg­u­la­tory ob­jec­tives.”

DAMON PAL­ING, PART­NER, PWC CHINA

The Gen­eral Ad­min­is­tra­tion of Cus­toms an­nounced on Wed­nes­day that it will launch cus­toms clear­ance re­form in Bei­jing and Tian­jin on July 1. The re­forms will be ex­panded to neigh­bor­ing prov­inces around Oc­to­ber. Re­form will also be un­der­taken in other ar­eas, such as the Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta, the Xin­hua News Agency re­ported.

“Trade fa­cil­i­ta­tion im­proves the ef­fi­ciency of goods move­ment, re­duces sup­ply chain bar­ri­ers and low­ers the costs of lo­gis­tics while safe­guard­ing le­git­i­mate govern­ment reg­u­la­tory ob­jec­tives,” said Damon Pal­ing, a part­ner who spe­cial­izes in trade and cus­toms is­sues in China for PwC.

In the con­text of China’s eco­nomic trans­for­ma­tion, reg­u­la­tors are pur­su­ing trade fa­cil­i­ta­tion mea­sures. At the same time, com­pa­nies are mov­ing to re­duce cus­toms du­ties in le­git­i­mate ways and cut sup­ply chain costs to im­prove their op­er­at­ing per­for­mance, said Pal­ing.

The es­tab­lish­ment of the China (Shang­hai) Pi­lot Free Trade Zone has pro­vided additional op­por­tu­ni­ties for bonded re­pair ser­vices, the re­port said.

About 20 per­cent of com­pa­nies plan to con­duct bonded re­pair op­er­a­tions in the zone, said the re­port. In the FTZ, they’ll be able to bring in ma­chin­ery, air­craft and other items for re­pair and then ex­port the re­fur­bished items with­out un­der­go­ing com­plex trade pro­ce­dures.

“Com­pared with the tra­di­tional orig­i­nal equip­ment man­u­fac­turer model, the global re­pair ser­vice en­cour­aged by the Chi­nese govern­ment has high value-added, non­pol­lut­ing and high-tech fea­tures. The in­tro­duc­tion of this ser­vice will max­i­mize com­pa­nies’ ca­pac­i­ties, meet their ac­tual needs in the mar­ket, and en­cour­age Chi­nese en­ter­prises to move to the high end of the value chain,” said Su­san Ju, a trade and cus­toms specialist at PwC.

Sev­eral pi­lot pro­grams launched in re­cent years have sent clear sig­nals to themar­ket to en­cour­age trans­for­ma­tion. En­ter­prises also need to ac­cel­er­ate their tran­si­tion in or­der to keep pace glob­ally, cre­ate value and main­tain a high level of trade com­pli­ance man­age­ment, said Ju.

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