Stag­gered traf­fic at rush hour on ta­ble

China Daily (Canada) - - SHANGHAI - By LI YANG in Shang­hai

The Shang­hai mu­nic­i­pal gov­ern­ment is con­sid­er­ing a stag­gered rush hour to ease mount­ing traf­fic con­ges­tion in the city, rep­re­sen­ta­tives of the peo­ple’s congress of Shang­hai said.

Hu Min, a peo­ple’s rep­re­sen­ta­tive and an auto en­gi­neer, said Mon­day that the Shang­hai mu­nic­i­pal gov­ern­ment told him his sug­ges­tion was con­struc­tive, and that rel­e­vant de­part­ments will lis­ten to ad­vice from var­i­ous par­ties as to how to im­ple­ment it.

“Traf­fic con­ges­tion dur­ing the morn­ing and evening rush hours be­comes nor­mal in more and more parts of the city, and the con­ges­tion usu­ally moves be­tween large res­i­den­tial com­mu­ni­ties and ar­eas of in­dus­trial parks and city business cen­ters,” said Hu, who stud­ied the is­sue in Shang­hai for sev­eral years.

Although the gov­ern­ment con­tin­ues to build new tun­nels, el­e­vated roads and sub­ways, the new in­fra­struc­ture al­ways lags the in­creas­ing traf­fic.

Hu sug­gested that the gov­ern­ment try a pi­lot stag­gered rush hour pro­gram in cer­tain ar­eas.

The de­vel­op­ment re­search cen­ter of Shang­hai’s gov­ern­ment said there must be a se­ries of sup­port­ing mea­sures and poli­cies be­fore the plan can take ef­fect, be­cause it in­volves not only traf­fic but also sched­ule changes of many in­ter­re­lated em­ploy­ers, who work at the same time of the day.

The cen­ter sug­gested that the gov­ern­ment in­crease in­put on pub­lic trans­porta­tion and raise aware­ness to make it the first op­tion for re­liev­ing con­ges­tion and cut­ting car­bon emis­sions.

The Shang­hai pub­lic se­cu­rity bureau said that traf­fic mainly comes from five groups: peo­ple go­ing to schools, fac­to­ries, en­ter­tain­ment sites, hos­pi­tals and gov­ern­ments. The first three groups mainly take buses and sub­ways.

Traf­fic con­ges­tion dur­ing the morn­ing and evening rush hours be­comes nor­mal in more and more parts of the city, and the con­ges­tion usu­ally moves be­tween large res­i­den­tial com­mu­ni­ties and ar­eas of in­dus­trial parks and city business cen­ters.” HU MIN PEO­PLE’S REP­RE­SEN­TA­TIVE AND AUTO EN­GI­NEER

The pub­lic se­cu­rity bureau said that white-col­lar work­ers in gov­ern­ment, com­pa­nies, banks and pub­lic de­part­ments should use pub­lic trans­porta­tion more.

Yang Xiaoguang, a pro­fes­sor of trans­porta­tion stud­ies at Tongji Univer­sity, said: “One third of em­ploy­ees in the United States have a flex­i­ble work­ing sched­ule, with the as­sis­tance of the In­ter­net. As a global city, Shang­hai needs to en­cour­age more peo­ple to work that way.”

GAO ERQIANG / CHINA DAILY

New el­e­vated roads can­not meet the fast-ris­ing de­mand cre­ated by ris­ing ve­hic­u­lar traf­fic in Shang­hai.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from China

© PressReader. All rights reserved.