... My ma­jor in­ter­est for Ti­bet is the his­tory and the sta­tus quo of the di­ver­sity of the Ti­betan lan­guage.”

China Daily (Canada) - - FRONT PAGE -

When Pro­fes­sor Ge­orge van Driem was pre­sented a hada, a tra­di­tional Ti­betan cer­e­mo­nial scarf made of white silk to show re­spects, kind­ness and good wishes, all the schol­ars in the meet­ing room in­side the Uni­ver­sity of Bern bursted into ap­plause.

A Chi­nese cul­tural del­e­ga­tion from the coun­try’s var­i­ous Ti­betol­ogy re­search cen­ters on Mon­day held a fo­rum dis­cus­sion with their Swiss peers to deepen mu­tual un­der­stand­ing and ex­changes in the Ti­betan stud­ies.

“As a lin­guist, my ma­jor in­ter­est for Ti­bet is the his­tory and the sta­tus quo of the di­ver­sity of the Ti­betan lan­guage, which al­ways at­tract me and my PHD stu­dents to do re­searches,” said prof. Driem.

For him, the splen­did na­ture beauty of Ti­bet is also a big at­trac­tion, and the first thing he want to do in Ti­bet is to have a look of the Mount Qo­molangma from the Ti­betan side of the Hi­malayan.

Duo Erji, direc­tor of Gen­eral Of­fice of the China Ti­betol­ogy Re­search Cen­ter, in­tro­duced that the Ti­betan lan­guage has been well pro­tect and even de­vel­oped based on the so­cial and eco­nomic im­prove­ments, with new Ti­betan words be­ing ap­peared very quickly.

Ac­cord­ing to ex­perts, Ti­betan script has a his­tory of more than 1,300 years and cur­rently, in the lat­est Chi­nese-Ti­betan Dic­tio­nary,

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from China

© PressReader. All rights reserved.