En­gag­ing in out­door ac­tiv­i­ties is a trend now — it looks cool and once you have mas­tered the es­sen­tial skills, you can spend your week­ends do­ing some­thing re­ally dif­fer­ent from the usual stuff such as din­ing out or watch­ing a film. It’s a to­tally new worl

China Daily (Canada) - - FRONT PAGE -

Wang Hengx­uan,

a Shang­hai

teenagers come to the park. The mar­ket is boom­ing. I don’t even need to ad­ver­tise about the pro­grams I have — those who have par­tic­i­pated in my ac­tiv­i­ties soon tell their friends about it and they bring more par­tic­i­pants the fol­low­ing week­end,” said Sun.

Fur­ther­more, peo­ple are be­gin­ning to re­al­ize the pos­i­tive im­pacts that such ac­tiv­i­ties can have on their health and well be­ing, and have been ea­ger to keep in shape, added Sun.

Tian Deyi, who had taken his son bik­ing on a hill in sub­ur­ban Hangzhou, Zhe­jiang province, is sup­port­ive about his child’s pref­er­ence to spend time out­doors in­stead of in­doors.

“I am more than happy to take him out cy­cling or try some­thing that can get him closer to na­ture. It helps to build up his mus­cles and it’s much bet­ter than play­ing com­puter games at home,” said the 37-year-old Shang­hai res­i­dent.

“I love watch­ing tele­vi­sion pro­grams, es­pe­cially doc­u­men­taries about out­door ac­tiv­i­ties such as trekking, bik­ing and rock-climb­ing. I am a huge fan of Bear Grylls and his Es­cape From Hell show, though I don’t think I would let my son eat worms like Grylls did in the show,” Tian quipped.

BY PRODIGY FOR CHINA DAILY PHOTO

Out­door equip­ment mak­ers have ben­e­fited from the ris­ing pop­u­lar­ity of out­door ac­tiv­i­ties. The in­dus­try grew 11.28 per­cent year-on-year in 2014.

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