More Chilean pro­duce set for China mar­kets

China Daily (Canada) - - SHANGHAI - By XU JUN­QIAN in Shang­hai

xu­jun­qian@chi­nadaily.com.cn

Shang­hai on Au­gust 23 kicked off “Chile Week” as part of the 45th an­niver­sary of diplo­matic re­la­tions be­tween the two na­tions. The week­long event aimed to pro­mote the Latin Amer­i­can coun­try’s pop­u­lar pro­duce like cher­ries and wine. For­mer Chilean pres­i­dent Ed­uardo Frei and a del­e­ga­tion team of 150 gov­ern­ment of­fi­cials and busi­ness­men made a trip down to Shang­hai for the oc­ca­sion.

China and Chile have long en­joyed good re­la­tion­ships, with Chile be­ing the first Latin Amer­i­can coun­try to es­tab­lish diplo­matic ties in the 1970’s and launch FTA talks with China. How­ever, this marks the first time that Chile is able to “reach to a pop­u­la­tion of 50 mil­lion peo­ple from two ma­jor cities (Shang­hai and Bei­jing) of its largest trad­ing part­ner”, said César Suárez, Con­sul of Shang­hai Com­merce Of­fice of Re­pub­lic of Chile.

It has been a decade since the two coun­tries signed a Free Trade Agree­ment (FTA) and up to 97 per­cent of the goods traded have ben­e­fited from this ar­range­ment since the be­gin­ning of this year. The types of pro­duce im­ported

Clau­dio Ter­nicier, from Chile to China are ex­pected to rise from 1,611 to 5,725 be­cause of the FTA.

Bi­lat­eral trade has in­creased four­fold to $34 bil­lion in 2014, com­pared with fig­ures be­fore 2005 when the FTA was signed. The value of ex­ports from Chile to China has also en­joyed an av­er­age an­nual growth rate of 25 per­cent through­out the past decade, ac­cord­ing to the Com­merce Of­fice of Chile.

While cop­per re­mains Chile’s sta­ple ex­port, ac­count­ing for 70 per­cent of the to­tal ex­ports to China, agri­cul­tural and forestry pro­duce have been the two ma­jor growth en­gines driv­ing the rapid in­crease in 2014. With the price of cop­per de­pre­ci­at­ing, the del­e­ga­tion team headed by Frei was in Shang­hai to di­ver­sify their of­fer­ings to China. The Chileans now look to be fo­cus­ing on agri­cul­ture, which has con­trib­uted to 25 per­cent of the to­tal ex­ports to China.

Nearly 80 per­cent of the cher­ries grown in Chile are now ex­ported to China, and dur­ing last year’s Spring Fes­ti­val, 70 per­cent of cher­ries sold in China came from Chile. One of the ma­jor ad­van­tages that Chile has is its counter-sea­sonal pro­duc­tion, mean­ing it can sup­ply fruit to China when most of their com­peti­tors can­not.

“Chi­nese con­sumers have al­ready been well in­formed of the fea­tures of our pro­duce: they are free of pol­lu­tion and food safety prob­lems, and are of high qual­ity,” said Clau­dio Ter­nicier, deputy min­is­ter of agri­cul­ture, dur­ing an ex­clu­sive in­ter­view with China Daily. “The big­gest chal­lenge for us at the mo­ment is to work out a sys­tem that could speed up the pace of get­ting ev­ery sin­gle type of pro­duce in­tro­duced to China.”

The big­gest chal­lenge for us at the mo­ment is to work out a sys­tem that could speed up the pace of get­ting ev­ery sin­gle type of pro­duce in­tro­duced to China.”

deputy min­is­ter of agri­cul­ture, Chile

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from China

© PressReader. All rights reserved.