‘Strictest’ mea­sures needed to en­sure food safety

China Daily (Canada) - - TOP NEWS - By WANG YANFEI in Bei­jing wangyan­fei@chi­nadaily.com.cn ByWANG YANFEI wangyan­fei@chi­nadaily.com.cn

China’s top lead­ers urged im­ple­men­ta­tion of the “strictest” mea­sures to en­sure food safety for the pub­lic.

Premier Li Ke­qiang pledged “zero tol­er­ance” for food safety vi­o­la­tions and urged govern­ment agen­cies to con­tinue their ef­forts to tackle ma­jor food safety is­sues and to make the in­ter­ests of the peo­ple their top pri­or­ity.

Vice-Premier Zhang Gaoli, who presided over a meet­ing of the State Coun­cil’s food safety com­mis­sion on Thurs­day, said, “The govern­ment should re­sort to the strictest su­per­vi­sion and tough­est pun­ish­ment for vi­o­la­tors, with a more uni­fied and au­thor­i­ta­tive su­per­vi­sion sys­tem and reg­u­la­tions.”

Food safety in China re­mains a big prob­lem that re­quires long- term work, de­spite a new food qual­ity law with tougher pun­ish­ments for vi­o­la­tors that took ef­fect on Oct 1.

Prob­lems such as the in­ap­pro­pri­ate China’s pro­cess­ing­top lead­ers of urged­food and im­ple­men­ta­tionex­ces­sive pes­ti­cideof the “strictest”residues mea­suresin agri­cul­tur­alto en­sure pro­duce food re­main­safety for se­vere,the pub­lic. ac­cord­ing to Teng Premier Ji­a­cai, Li deputy Ke­qiang head pledgedof the China“zero tol­er­ance”Food and for Drug food Ad­min­is­tra­tion, safety vi­o­la­tions the and coun­try’surged gov­ern­ment­top food safety agen­cies reg­u­la­tor.to con­tinue theirIn one ef­fort­sof theto tack­le­most re­cent ma­jor cases,food safety35 restau­rantsis­sues and to sell­ing make pop­u­larthe in­ter­ests dishes of werethe peo­ple­found to their have top used pri­or­ity. ground poppy seed­pods Vice-Premieras sea­son­ingZhang Gaoli,to at­tractwho presided con­sumers. over The a meetingad­di­tive, of the bannedS­tate Coun­cil’ss­ince 2013,food safe­ty­can cause com­mis­sion ad­dic­tion on and Thurs­day,se­ri­ous harm­said, “Theto hu­man govern­ment health, should­said the re­sort ad­min­is­tra­tion.to the strictest su­per­vi­sion Be­fore­and tough­est­that, overuse pun­ish­mentof strong,for vi­o­la­tors low-cost with a pes­ti­cidesmore uni in Guang­dong prov­ince in De­cem­ber re­vealed loop­holes in su­per­vi­sion, es­pe­cially in ru­ral ar­eas.

Farm­ers in Zengcheng district in Guangzhou il­le­gally used mix­tures of highly toxic pun­ish­ments for vi­o­la­tors that took ef­fect onOct 1.

Prob­lems such as the in­ap­pro­pri­ate pro­cess­ing of food pes­ti­cidesand ex­ces­sive two or pes­ti­cide­three times­resi a week with­out su­per­vi­sion, China Cen­tral Tele­vi­sion re­ported.

“It is very dif­fi­cult to ef­fec­tively in­spect ev­ery­one — from farm­ers to food man­u­fac­tur­ers — to en­sure they all fol­low

In­one of the most re­cent cases, 35 restau­rants sell­ing pop­u­lar dishes were found to have used ground poppy seed­pods th­eas sea­son­inglaw,” said to Chen at­tract Qiaol­ing,con­sum founder of Yueyaduo, a food safety re­search cen­ter at Ts­inghua Univer­sity.

“There is a lot more needed to be done by the lo­cal gov­ern­ments to make sure that laws and reg­u­la­tions are Guang­dong prov­ince in De­cem­ber re­vealed loop­holes in su­per­vi­sion, es­pe­cially in ru­ral ar­eas.

Farm­ers in Zengcheng district in Guangzhou il­le­gally used mix­tures of highly toxic pes­ti­cides two or three times a week with­out su­per­vi­sion, China Cen­tral Tele­vi­sion re­ported.

“It is very dif­fi­cult to ef­fec­tively in­spect ev­ery­one— from farm­ers to food man­u­fac­tur­ers — to en­sure they all fol­low the law,” said Chen Qiaol­ing, founder of Yueyaduo, a food safety re­search cen­ter atTs­inghua Univer­sity.

“There is a lot more needed to be done by the lo­cal gov­ern­ments to make sure that laws and reg­u­la­tions are in place. If at any point the su­per­vi­sion in place. If at any point the su­per­vi­sion fails along the farm-to-ta­ble chain, cus­tomers will be­come the vic­tims,” he said.

Xin­hua con­trib­uted to this story.

LI XIN / FOR CHINA DAILY LI XIN / FOR CHINA DAILY

Of­fi­cers in­spect pro­cessed pork in Huaibei, An­hui prov­ince, early this month.

Of­fi­cers in­spect pro­cessed pork in Huaibei, An­hui prov­ince, in early Jan­uary.

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