Civil sec­tor job ap­pli­ca­tions in Shang­hai de­cline yet again

China Daily (Canada) - - SHANGHAI - By ZHOU WENTING in Shang­hai

zhouwent­ing@chi­nadaily. com.cn

The num­ber of peo­ple ap­ply­ing for govern­ment jobs in Shang­hai has dropped for the third con­sec­u­tive year from 48,000 in 2014 to 37,000 this year, ac­cord­ing to the Shang­hai Ad­min­is­tra­tion of Civil Ser­vice.

Based on the lat­est fig­ures from the Min­istry of Hu­man Re­sources and So­cial Se­cu­rity, the to­tal num­ber of ap­pli­cants for govern­ment jobs in the coun­try had also fallen from 2.19 mil­lion in 2014 to 2.05 mil­lion last year.

“The main rea­son be­hind this de­cline is that an­nual bonuses have been af­fected due to the anti-cor­rup­tion drive,” said Zhou Hai­wang, deputy di­rec­tor of the In­sti­tute of Ur­ban and Pop­u­la­tion De­vel­op­ment Stud­ies at the Shang­hai Academy of So­cial Sci­ences.

Zhou added that a num­ber of pub­lic ser­vants have also re­signed due to fac­tors such as lim­ited pro­mo­tion op­por­tu­ni­ties. One such in­di­vid­ual is Zhao Chen, who grad­u­ated from the elite Shang­hai Jiao Tong Univer­sity with a mas­ter’s de­gree. He re­signed one year af­ter join­ing a govern­ment mar­ket watch­dog in 2013.

“There was not too much to learn at work and I was afraid that my salary would fall be­hind my for­mer class­mates af­ter five years,” said Zhao, who de­cided to en­ter the real es­tate in­dus­try in­stead.

Ac­cord­ing to a sur­vey re­leased by lead­ing job web­site Zhaopin.com, civil ser­vants were the most ac­tive job hop­pers as of April 2015, with 30 per­cent more of them hav­ing left their po­si­tions com­pared to the pre­vi­ous year.

Some off i c i a l s h ave ex­pressed their con­cern over the fewer num­ber of ap­pli­cants from elite univer­si­ties in the com­ing years, and plans are al­ready be­ing for­mu­lated to ad­dress the prob­lem.

“We’re mulling over how to at­tract top tal­ent. One of the moves could be to of­fer schemes that al­low top grad­u­ates from elite univer­si­ties to fast track their ca­reers in the govern­ment,” said an anony­mous of­fi­cial.

Good ca­reer prospects and man­age­able job pres­sure are

The main rea­son be­hind the de­cline is that an­nual bonuses have been af­fected due to the anti-cor­rup­tion drive.”

Zhou Hai­wang,

deputy di­rec­tor of the In­sti­tute of Ur­ban and Pop­u­la­tion De­vel­op­ment Stud­ies at the Shang­hai Academy of So­cial Sci­ences

cur­rently the main fac­tors that youths con­sider when ap­ply­ing for govern­ment jobs in Shang­hai, ac­cord­ing to re­cruit­ment ex­perts.

In terms of the most over­sub­scribed jobs, the post of a clerk at the Lu­ji­azui fi­nan­cial zone in Pudong New Area topped the list with 15 peo­ple sign­ing up for one po­si­tion. Sim­i­lar po­si­tions at the gen­eral of­fice of the Shang­hai Mu­nic­i­pal Peo­ple’s Govern­ment and the gen­eral of­fice of the com­mit­tee for Shang­hai’s political ad­vi­sory body took se­cond and third place re­spec­tively.

The most pop­u­lar job po­si­tions are those in govern­ment de­part­ments that ap­pli­cants per­ceive to be pres­ti­gious and have less stress­ful en­vi­ron­ments, such as the mu­nic­i­pal govern­ment’s gen­eral of­fice, the tourism board and the de­vel­op­ment and re­form com­mis­sion.

Lu Yuan, who will grad­u­ate with a bach­e­lor’s de­gree in law from Shang­hai In­ter­na­tional Stud­ies Univer­sity in June, ap­plied for a po­si­tion at the city’s tax ad­min­is­tra­tion of­fice.

“I worked as an in­tern in a law of­fice (in the pri­vate sec­tor) for sev­eral months and the work pres­sure was over­whelm­ing. I be­lieve that the work­load for pub­lic ser­vants is not as heavy and they can of­fer me a bet­ter work-life bal­ance,” said Lu, a 22-year-old na­tive of Jiangsu prov­ince.

In con­trast, the least pop­u­lar job po­si­tions were those in pris­ons and drug re­ha­bil­i­ta­tion cen­ters.

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