Film sum­mit ex­plores Hol­ly­wood-China ties

China Daily (Canada) - - ACROSS AMERICAS - By LIA ZHU in San Fran­cisco li­azhu@chi­nadai­lyusa.com

Hol­ly­wood and China will deepen their col­lab­o­ra­tion in the movie in­dus­try at a Los An­ge­les sum­mit next month, where thought lead­ers, top ex­ec­u­tives and tal­ent will dis­cuss China’s mount­ing bet on Hol­ly­wood, an­i­ma­tion and the fu­ture of dig­i­tal and im­mer­sive en­ter­tain­ment.

The Sev­enth An­nual US-China Film Sum­mit, sched­uled for Nov 1 at the Luskin Con­fer­ence Cen­ter at the Univer­sity of Cal­i­for­nia-Los An­ge­les, will fea­ture pan­els ex­am­in­ing timely is­sues and will in­tro­duce “Tal­ent Spotlight” and “Ex­ec­u­tive Spotlight” keynote con­ver­sa­tions, ac­cord­ing to Asia So­ci­ety South­ern Cal­i­for­nia, the sum­mit or­ga­nizer.

“Tal­ent Spotlight” speak­ers in­clude Jon M. Chu, di­rec­tor of the Now You See Me and Step Up movies; “Ex­ec­u­tive Spotlight” speak­ers in­clude Jack Gao, CEO of the Wanda Cul­tural In­dus­try Group, and Michael El­lis, Asia-Pa­cific pres­i­dent and man­ag­ing di­rec­tor of MPA.

Dur­ing the sum­mit, the pan­elists and speak­ers are ex­pected to dis­cuss top­ics such as China’s deep­en­ing bet on Hol­ly­wood tal­ent and Amer­ica’s ground­work to de­velop new fi­nanc­ing sources in China, China’s dig­i­tal-con­tent prom­ise and lessons for Hol­ly­wood, as well as the art of mak­ing in­ter­na­tional co-productions.

“In the past year, col­lab­o­ra­tion be­tween Hol­ly­wood and China has taken off in new di­rec­tions, and Asia So­ci­ety’s US-China Film Sum­mit brings to­gether the thought lead­ers and key peo­ple at the fore­front of this dy­namic re­la­tion­ship,” said Tom Nagorski, ex­ec­u­tive vice-pres­i­dent of Asia So­ci­ety.

Dur­ing the event, three hon­orees — Wang Zhon­glei, vice-chair­man and CEO of Huayi Broth­ers Me­dia; Melissa Cobb, head of stu­dio and CEO of Ori­en­tal Dream­Works, and Cao Baop­ing, a writer and di­rec­tor — will be hon­ored for their roles in film in­dus­try lead­er­ship, US-China creative col­lab­o­ra­tion and award­win­ning sto­ry­telling, re­spec­tively.

“Hol­ly­wood and China’s film in­dus­try are still learn­ing to get to know how the other op­er­ates. The au­di­ence in China and the au­di­ence in Amer­ica are enor­mous. They need one an­other,” said Jonathan Lan­dreth, co-or­ga­nizer of the sum­mit and the man­ag­ing ed­i­tor of China File, a web­site of the Asia So­ci­ety in New York.

He ex­plained that it was be­cause Chi­nese finance was be­com­ing more im­por­tant to Hol­ly­wood com­pa­nies to make mul­ti­mil­lion-dol­lar bud­get block­buster films, and the Chi­nese au­di­ence was be­com­ing more im­por­tant to jus­tify the pro­duc­tion of such enor­mously ex­pen­sive movies.

Hol­ly­wood has a lot to teach China. ... Much of the world doesn’t watch Chi­nese films.”

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