It’s very im­por­tant to take a po­si­tion against the poach­ing, be­cause what hap­pens here is about all of us.”

China Daily (Latin America Weekly) - - Holiday - XIN­HUA

Ed­wardo Quarda,

Once snared in traps, song­birds are sold to restau­rants for the il­le­gal but widely avail­able del­i­cacy “am­be­lopou­lia” — a trade worth some $18.8 mil­lion an­nu­ally.

Be­cause Cyprus is a key stopover on the mi­gra­tion route of many birds, in­clud­ing black­caps and war­blers, the trap­ping mainly takes place dur­ing the au­tumn.

New weapon

Last year, po­lice on a Bri­tish mil­i­tary base in Cyprus launched a new weapon in their fight against poach­ers, who had been re­spon­si­ble for large scale trap­ping over decades. A top-of-the-range drone, with night-vi­sion ca­pa­bil­i­ties, is al­ready en­hanc­ing the po­lice’s abil­ity to cover ar­eas which have proved dif­fi­cult to reach in the past.

In many Mediter­ranean coun­tries, poach­ing re­mains a lively topic of con­ver­sa­tion, given that some lo­cals — es­pe­cially the younger gen­er­a­tions — sup­port hunt­ing bans, whilst res­i­dents in many ru­ral com­mu­ni­ties de­fend trap­ping as an ageold cus­tom.

“It’s very im­por­tant to take a po­si­tion against the poach­ing, be­cause what hap­pens here is about all of us,” said Ed­wardo Quarda from CABS. “It con­cerns all the pop­u­la­tions from Europe.”

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