Mu­seum seeks fresh sou­venir ideas

China Daily (USA) - - CHINA - By ZHOU WENTING in Shang­hai zhouwent­ing@ chi­nadaily.com.cn

The Shang­hai Mu­seum of SunYat-sen’sFormerRes­i­dence is invit­ing young peo­ple from the Chi­nese main­land and Tai­wan to con­trib­ute ideas to cre­ate sou­venirs for the mu­seum.

Pic­tures of nearly 30 pre­cious cul­tural relics col­lected by the mu­seum will be avail­able for ref­er­ence dur­ing the de­sign con­test, which runs through the end of this year, to com­mem­o­rate the 150th an­niver­sary of Sun’s birth in­Novem­ber.

The relics in­clude the med­i­cal de­vices that Sun used when he prac­ticed medicine, pho­tos taken when he was com­man­der of the Repub­lic of China’s army and a photo of Sun and Soong Ching Ling when they mar­ried in Ja­pan in Oc­to­ber 1915.

Con­testrules­can­be­foundon the web­site of Shang­hai’s Revo­lu­tion­aryCom­mit­tee of theChi­nese Kuom­intang, which held the con­test with the Shang­hai Sun Yat-sen and Soong Ching Ling Cul­tural Relics Man­age­ment Com­mit­tee, and the Re­search Cen­ter of Cre­ative In­dus­try un­der the Shang­hai Academy of So­cial Sciences.

Huang Yap­ing,

direc­tor, Shang­hai Sun Yat-sen and Soong Ching-ling Cul­tural Relics Man­age­ment Com­mit­tee

“We hope that Sun is not only a po­lit­i­cal fig­ure but a cul­tural sym­bol for univer­sal fra­ter­nity and un­remit­ting ef­forts. We­hopethey­ounggen­er­a­tion from both the Chi­nese main­land and Tai­wan can in­ter­pret the relics from their own per­cep­tions and show orig­i­nal de­signs that meet the needs of the times and are pop­u­lar with peo­ple,” said the direc­tor of the mu­seum’s depart­ment of cul­tural relics pro­tec­tion, who would give only his sur­name, Wang.

The good ideas will be turned into sou­venirs, he said.

Sun and Soong lived in the res­i­dence on Xiang­shan Road in down­town Shang­hai from 1918 to 1925, when Sun died. Soong con­tin­ued to live there un­til 1937.

Wang said the coun­try en­cour­ages mu­se­ums to de­velop cre­ative sou­venirs, and both the Palace Mu­seum in Bei­jing and Shang­hai Mu­seum set ex­cel­lent ex­am­ples.

The Palace Mu­seum, also known as the For­bid­den City, be­gan to in­tro­duce cre­ative sou­venirs two years ago and won wide ap­plause. They in­clude ear­phones that look like a string of coral beadsworn by of­fi­cials in theQingDy­nasty (1644-1911) and re­frig­er­a­tor mag­nets de­pict­ing an em­peror and em­press as cute car­toons.

“We used to hold conservative ideas for na­tional-level pre­cious cul­tural relics, and em­pha­sized pro­tec­tion rather than de­vel­op­ment and uti­liza­tion. It was quite a break­through when the Palace Mu­seum de­vel­oped in­no­va­tive and pop­u­lar sou­venirs,” Huang Yap­ing, direc­tor of Shang­hai Sun Yat-sen and Soong Ching Ling Cul­tural Relics Man­age­ment Com­mit­tee, was quoted as say­ing by the pa­per.cn.

It was quite a break­through when the Palace Mu­seum de­vel­oped in­no­va­tive and pop­u­lar sou­venirs.”

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