Trump goes af­ter ‘dis­loyal’ GOP

China Daily (USA) - - ACROSS AMERICA - By AGEN­CIES

Repub­li­can pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Don­ald Trump lashed out at US House Speaker Paul Ryan and other “dis­loyal” Repub­li­cans on Tues­day, vow­ing to cam­paign in what­ever style he wants now that the party es­tab­lish­ment has largely aban­doned him.

Trump, in a bar­rage of Twit­ter posts, con­demned the Repub­li­cans who have backed away from his White House run, deep­en­ing a rift in the party over his cam­paign for the Nov 8 elec­tion.

“It is so nice that the shack­les have been taken off me and I can now fight for Amer­ica the way I want to,” Trump said on Twit­ter, adding he would en­gage Demo­cratic ri­val Hil­lary Clin­ton on his own terms.

De­scrib­ing “dis­loyal” Repub­li­cans as more dif­fi­cult than Clin­ton, he said: “They come at you from all sides. They don’t know how to win — I will teach them!”

A string of Repub­li­can of­fi­cials and of­fice­hold­ers have dis­tanced them­selves from Trump since a 2005 video sur­faced on Fri­day show­ing him brag­ging crudely to a re­porter about grop­ing women and mak­ing sex­ual ad­vances.

A Reuters/Ip­sos poll of likely vot­ers re­leased on Tues­day found 58 per­cent of Repub­li­cans wanted Trump to stay atop their party’s ticket and 68 per­cent said the GOP lead­er­ship should stand by him.

Trump slammed Ryan as a “very weak and in­ef­fec­tive leader” and com­plained in an­other tweet that it was hard to do well with “zero sup­port” from Ryan and oth­ers.

Trump also took aim at US Se­na­tor John McCain of Ari­zona, the 2008 Repub­li­can pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee, who said on Satur­day that he could not vote for Trump.

“The very foul mouthed Sen. John McCain begged for my sup­port dur­ing his pri­mary (I gave, he won), then dropped me over locker room re­marks,” Trump said on Twit­ter.

Among the emails made pub­lic Tues­day by Wik­iLeaks was one from Clin­ton cam­paign spokesman Nick Mer­rill. “Goal would be to cau­ter­ize this just enough so it plays out over the week­end and dies in the short term,” Mer­rill wrote on March 6, 2015.

Clin­ton did not pub­licly con­firm or dis­cuss her use of the email server un­til March 10 in a speech at the United Na­tions, nearly a week af­ter AP re­vealed the server’s ex­is­tence.

Wik­iLeaks be­gan re­leas­ing on Oct 7 what it said were years of mes­sages from ac­counts used by Clin­ton cam­paign chair­man John Podesta. He has ac­knowl­edged his emails were hacked.

In May 2015, Clin­ton spokesman Brian Fal­lon alerted other staffers that the Jus­tice Depart­ment was propos­ing to pub­lish Clin­ton’s work-re­lated emails by Jan­uary in re­sponse to re­quests by news or­ga­ni­za­tions.

REUTERS

Demo­cratic pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Hil­lary Clin­ton poses with fans af­ter talk­ing about cli­mate change with Vice Pres­i­dent Al Gore at a rally at Mi­ami Dade Col­lege in Florida on Tues­day.

REUTERS

Repub­li­can pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Don­ald Trump cam­paigns at a rally in Wilkes-Barre, Penn­syl­va­nia, on Mon­day.

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